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  • hubcapboy
    replied
    Here's my thingy diagram of the three harnesses above that are mysterious. It looks like I forgot to connect pin 6 of the green connector, so the power supply for the coolant pump will need to be a mystery for now. There's a pdf attached to the post which reads a lot better that the jpeg... but honestly this all hurts my eyes compared to looking at it in autocad with a black background.

    My next task here is to compare this to the X3 harness I have to see if there's helpful length and to the Z4 DME pinout to make sure it works with the flash.

    Then I can half-tone everything that stays, highlight everything I don't need, and overlay the connections that I need to make to the C101 and e30 dash for the accelerator and OBD.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Harness.JPG Views:	0 Size:	82.0 KB ID:	9951506
    Attached Files

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  • hubcapboy
    replied
    I don't know how helpful this is going to be for everyone else, but based on what I've just learned this has prevented about 12 boneheaded "I wonder why it doesn't start" moments and maybe 3 "I wonder why my battery keeps dying" moments.

    I know all the circuit information is in the TIS, but for the e90 there's 3 or 4 revisions of a few parts of this harness, and the TIS only lets you look at one little part at a time. I end up chasing one circuit through and forgetting where I was. This is an attempt to document the 2006 330i harness that I have to start with... so that I can compare it to the X3 harness that I think I bought for some additional length, and so that I can understand how to sew in my additional wiring, or re-use wires that I won't be using. The wiring harness can be broken down into four parts by unplugging connectors.

    X60001:

    This starts out pretty anticlimactic. The X60001 connector goes into the smaller of the two DME plugs. The reason this is cut off from everything is this handily only contains wires that go back into the dash. None of the X60001 conductors are part of the engine harness... this is the DME's connection to the interion including CAS, Battery sensor, Brake light switch, exhaust flap, accelerator pedal, clutch switch, wheel speed, OBD... we're going to be using a lot of these later for connecting to the car.
    Click image for larger version

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    The Crab Harness:

    My brother named this the crab harness. We used to have a crab intake, we may as well have a crab something. this is mostly sensors but also has the DISA changeover plugs, throttle valve and the starter trigger. It includes the X60002 connector from the small DME plug (which is mostly 02 sensor related) and the X60005 connector from the large DME plug (which is the largest connector and has most of the engine business sensors as well as the BSD bus for the alternator and oil condition sensor). This harness also includes a relay for the crankcase breather heaters, and everything that doesn't go back to the DME goes to a Maroon X60551 connector.
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    The Rail Harness:

    This harness has two plastic rails, one with the 6 injector plugs and one with the 6 ignition coil plugs. Each rail has some "front of engine" sensors plopping out of it. The valvetronic motor pops out of the middle of the ignition rail. All of the ignition signals connect to the X60006 connector in the big DME plug, all of the valvetronic wiring is on X60004 in the big DME plug, and all of the fronty engine stuff like VANOS solenoids, thermostat, water pump, the eccentric shaft sensor for valvetronic, the camshaft position sensors, and the oil pressure switch return to the X60007 connector in the big DME plug. There's also a valvtronic activation relay hanging off this harness, which is powered by the positive lead ring connector. I don't understand why this is powered separately, but I expect I need to dig up a fuse for that.

    Everything that needs to be passed on to the car such as the AC compressor signal, or several different power supplies is passed to a green X60552 plug.

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    The power harness:

    The power harness looks small, but honestly this is a huge mess. This was the hardest part to figure out, because powers and grounds are spliced, there's fuse blocks... ugh. The power harness plugs into the crab harness with the maroon X60551 connector, and the rail harness with the green X60552 connector. It also powers the DME with the X60003 connector, which is in the small plug. It has a B+ distribution which is the main power for the engine, and needs a 60 amp fuse added. All the grounds combine here and go to chassis, and there are 7 fuses. This harness also has a blue plug that goes to the chassis with the AC compressor signal, the reverse switch (which is the long protected wire that we won't need because our reverse switch is chassis-side already), the starter signal... the wakeup signal... the CAS injector relay signal... it's basically the e90 equivalent of the C101.

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  • hoveringuy
    replied
    Awesome! I want.


    "The weapon holder in the central rear seat armrest provides space for an MP5 and three magazines. The holder is fitted with a lock, which is operated via a switch operated from the front seats."

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  • hubcapboy
    replied
    https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/e...-mount/jEaXCzb

    Most obscure e90 option?

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  • hoveringuy
    replied
    The other thing I've realized is that there was a change to the electrical architecture of e90's in 2007.The fuses and DME relay that were integral to the harness prior to 2007 moved from the engine box to the cabin, no longer integrated with harness.

    It's still not difficult to add the relay and fuses, but the e90 harness seems too short on the injector/coil side anyway.

    Will probably get X3.

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  • wazzu70
    replied
    Exciting news. We need more of the swaps!

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  • hoveringuy
    replied
    We were reviewing basic Dynamics 101 material, and although a 125 ft-lb rating doesn't sound like much, it's at a higher rotational speed at the driveshaft, and translates to 406 ft-lbs at the wheels through a 3.25 differential.

    Leave a comment:


  • nando
    replied
    oh yeah, I had forgotten about the difference in the transmission between the 325/328 and 330. Regardless, a 6mt sells for like $800 alone, so you did pretty good on that engine. Also, BPC broke theirs at like 500hp (turbo 325i), so I really doubt you will have a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • hubcapboy
    replied
    We learned a ton today. Thanks for the ride. I was working on a cardboard to-do list round trip, and ordering two of everything.

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  • hoveringuy
    replied
    Spoiler alert!

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Capture.JPG Views:	0 Size:	72.9 KB ID:	9951191

    I picked-up a 67k mile motor out of a 2010 328i with the help of this thread's host, Gareth.

    We compared his motor with mine and he immediately noticed that my transmission is 2" shorter. Turns out that I have a Getrag G6-17 and he has the G6-37. The difference is in the torque rating and the 37 was used on the slightly more powerful 330's. It's rated for 273ft-lbs while the 17 is weaker at 125ft-lbs. RealOEM has the 37 weighing 95.9 while the 17 is 74.5, almost a 20lb difference.

    Seeing as how the 17 is installed in the heavier 5 series, and that people have been upgrading their 328's to 330 specs for a long time now, I'm not worried about it, plus with an N54 intake I'll be making power by spinning the motor faster at about the same torque.

    One of the other differences is that the newer motor has the oil separation built into the valve cover, so no external cyclone separator and the required drainback into the pan.

    The entire package was only $2300. Cheap!
    Last edited by hoveringuy; 09-17-2020, 08:22 PM.

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  • LukeJ
    replied
    Originally posted by hubcapboy View Post
    Huh I thought I'd included that in a post somewhere... I only got the factory steel pan to hold 4 liters... were you measuring with it tilted over at 30 degrees? the lowest point for me was the low side flange. Filled to 1/2" below the top of the wing, the steel one I built came out to 4.8. Even if the factory one is actually 5 that seems... fine.

    No doubt 4.8 liters will be just fine. 4.8 liters is 5.0721 quarts.

    When I 'measured' the stock oil pan, I used a Rubbermaid juice pitcher. Which might explain the difference in our measurements since it's hardly a precision tool. I used water, but that shouldn't make a difference. :-)

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  • LukeJ
    replied
    Originally posted by hubcapboy View Post
    Huh I thought I'd included that in a post somewhere... I only got the factory steel pan to hold 4 liters... were you measuring with it tilted over at 30 degrees? the lowest point for me was the low side flange. Filled to 1/2" below the top of the wing, the steel one I built came out to 4.8. Even if the factory one is actually 5 that seems... fine.
    Yes, of course 30 degrees and a slight tilt to the rear as confirmed by a digital level. 5 quarts went right up to the end of the large radius out of the sump. It was on the verge of spilling out the low side. The factory specs call for 7 quarts, so when I measured 5 it seemed reasonable since the filter contains some oil and when the engine is running the other quart+ is being circulated. Which also means the sump is 'full' most of the time. There is also a 'small sump' at the front of the factory pan that seems to correspond with oiling the oil pump chain. But maybe BMW put it there for no reason. I incorporated a feature in my baffle that will make a small pool of oil under the sprocket just in case. I plan on using a Porsche Boxster oil pickup with a 1" SS elbow and misc. Like you said, a drain plug on it's side in the back will drain more oil, or something like that.

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  • hubcapboy
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	9950622I’m mostly interested in not applying any force from the road directly to the engine... particularly since the pan bolts are aluminum. I’m in a city where I scrape my skid plate pretty regularly, even when I’m trying to pay attention.

    Oil drain might be on the rear on the side of the pan. I think you can actually get it lower on the side because the boss for the thread doesn’t have to stick up.

    The pickup on this oil pump doesn’t actually have a bolt at the pump, so the only option is fixing it by windage tray bolts. One of the four locations is the pump bolt, and I think I’ll actually need all three of the remaining bolts to hold the pickup in place.

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  • hoveringuy
    replied
    This means the pickup will make an immediate turn down from the pump inlet, a factor will be giving it the bracing to keep it from pendulum-ing around. Tie into the first set of windage bolts?

    Oil drain facing the rear?

    If the front, angled section is a bit thicker, like 12 or 14Ga, or internally ribbed/reinforced, do you still need a skid plate?

    Looks great!

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  • hubcapboy
    replied
    Huh I thought I'd included that in a post somewhere... I only got the factory steel pan to hold 4 liters... were you measuring with it tilted over at 30 degrees? the lowest point for me was the low side flange. Filled to 1/2" below the top of the wing, the steel one I built came out to 4.8. Even if the factory one is actually 5 that seems... fine.

    Leave a comment:

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