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e30 M3 minor rust repair.

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  • MadSci
    replied
    my goodness...this is brilliant :shock:

    Leave a comment:


  • Massimo
    replied
    It has been 2 months please tell me there is going to be an awesome update very soon?

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  • leez
    replied
    absolutely beautiful build.

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  • boriksh
    replied
    amassing skills, great project!

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  • evandael
    replied
    Originally posted by Massimo View Post
    This car and own have true BOSS status. Hope it dose not become a garage queen.

    it's been covered a lot of times.. he's gonna drive the wheels off this thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massimo
    replied
    This car and own have true BOSS status. Hope it dose not become a garage queen.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattAvino
    replied
    great update. Love the red injectors, little details... so perfect.

    Leave a comment:


  • xworks
    replied
    Apologies for the lack of updates in here for the last while folks, the
    finishing post was in sight and it was all steam ahead to avoid another
    summer lost fu*king about in the garage. Now that theres some more
    free time again I'll try and finish telling the story.

    First part of the fuel system overhaul started many, many moon's ago
    in a galaxy far, far away. The old fuel tank was kaput. She had started to
    rust at the seams and once the rust gets in here theres not many viable options
    to repair.
    So, new tank.......



    and a fresh "in tank" lift pump to replace the old unit..........



    The "in-tank" fuel pump shown above has one sole purpose and thats
    to suck fuel out of the tank and pump it to the main high pressure fuel
    pump shown below.........



    Also included in the pic above is the fuel filter below the high pressure pump.
    I think early cars had the filter mounted along side the high pressure pump like
    shown above whereas later cars had the filter mounted separately up in the
    engine bay.
    As always seems to be the case, just after I'd coughed up the ransom
    to replace the pair of fuel pumps I came across a forum thread detailing
    how to junk the 2 pump setup and replace it with a single "in-tank" high
    pressure pump instead, which works out a damn sight cheaper.

    Fu*king forums.

    With the new pumps in place all the associated plumbing was freshened up aswell.
    Actually, was a little frightening to see the condition some of the old fuel hoses
    were in. Do yourself a favour, if your driving a twenty year old car and don't
    know when the fuel hoses were last changed, put it on the top of the
    "Shit to do" list. Unless your Michael J. Fox and driving a DeLorean
    then flames don't look so good coming out from underneath a moving car.........



    So, pumps and hoses in, the fuel can now get from the tank all the way up
    to the engine bay where upon it fills this little item.......



    Which is of course the fuel rail. When the engine is up and running the ecu opens
    the injectors for a preprogrammed amount of time to squirt in just the right amount of
    fuel thats needed. For this to work then the fuel present in the fuel rail has to be at a constant
    pressure. For this engine that pressure is 3 bar. The ecu has no way of watching the fuel pressure
    and will always presume the fuel pressure is 3 bar. If for some reason something went tits up and
    the fuel pressure went higher than this in the rail, then the ecu still opens the injectors the same
    length of time and more fuel will get squirted in leading to the engine running rich.
    Likewise if the pressure dropped in the rail less fuel would be squirted in running the engine lean.

    So, how the hell do we keep fuel at the right pressure in the fuel rail?
    Well, it's all done by this little lad bolted on to the end of the fuel rail,
    surprisingly known as the fuel pressure regulator.........



    It's not a terribly complicated device and if your not familiar with the workings of one
    then probably the best way of describing how it works is comparing it to placing your
    finger over the end of a garden hose. When you block the water coming out of the hose the
    pressure builds, let your finger off a little and some water squirts out and the pressure
    drops off in the hose. The regulator shown above does basically the same thing.
    The fuel pump pumps the fuel up to the fuel rail, fills the rail and try's to flow out the end of the
    fuel rail where it meets the regulator. Inside the regulator there's a little valve held shut with a
    spring. Once the fuel pressure builds up enough force to push the spring back the valve opens
    and lets some fuel return back to the fuel tank. In this regulator the spring is just the
    right tension to keep the fuel rail pressurised at 3 bar all the time and it's constantly open
    to some degree returning fuel to the petrol tank.



    Next up is the injectors.
    As you may have seen previously during the build theres been a few mods done to the
    engine to improve it's breathing capability with a view to finding some extra horse power.
    And as the engine should hopefully now be fit to take in more air we're going to have to
    mix some more fuel with this to find the extra bhp.
    Unfortunately the standard injectors weren't going to be up to the task for this engine.
    As mentioned earlier the Ecu opens and closes the injectors to allow the fuel to be squirted
    into the engine. As the revs start to rise the amount of time the ecu has available to
    open and close the injectors to get the fuel in before those inlet valves close and combustion starts
    is getting smaller and smaller. With the increased amount of air now coming into this engine at high revs
    the ecu simply hasn't enough time to keep the injectors open long enough to get enough fuel in.
    So, the solution?
    Larger injectors.
    Bellow you can see a picture of the old standard injector and on the right the new
    larger cc injectors I've bought............



    Theres an absolute ton of waffle that can be written about selecting which
    injectors for your engine and I'm not going to go in to the details of how I
    came to my choice here, cause to be perfectly honest I think I just got
    pissed off reading about them in the end and picked these.

    If your in a similar position down the line then some things worth reading up
    on are:

    injector resistance - injectors are basically split into two different groups,
    high resistance and low resistance. The standard M3 injectors are low resistance
    and most after market ecu's prefer high resistance. Fitting low resistance injectors
    to an aftermarket ecu that needs high resistance one's can end up melting the ecu.

    injector cc/min - injectors are usually listed for the amount of fuel they can flow
    per minute at a given pressure. Usually you'll see them listed in cc/min (cubic centimeters per minute)
    or lbs/hr (pounds per hour).
    A standard 195bhp M3 injector flows 236cc of fuel per minute at 3 bar fuel pressure.
    The new ones I've bought pictured above and below flow 370cc per minute at 3bar.

    injector body - a quick search around the interweb will show that injectors come in all different shapes
    and sizes. The standard injectors in an M3 are usually referred to as a Bosch EV1 style.
    As I wanted the new injectors to be a straight forward fit with the fuel rail and the electrical connector
    rail I've choose to stick with the EV1 style body.

    More details of the actual injectors I ended up buying can be found here.........
    http://www.fiveomotorsport.com/380cc...hed-import-fit
    (just remember, they're high resistance injectors and unsuitable for the standard ecu).

    One last vital modification to the injectors before they can be fitted was to paint em red.
    This mod alone will add up 40 horse power and improve fuel economy,
    remember where you heard it first...........





    Now that everything was in place the next stage could begin, wiring things up
    while holding a fire extinguisher.
    Will try and have it up by the end of the week.

    Till then.......

    Leave a comment:


  • MattAvino
    replied
    ^+1

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  • 95///M3
    replied
    Any new updates?

    Leave a comment:


  • PGAero
    replied
    First of all, absolutely love this thread.

    I'm pretty sure Saab has used COP since '93 (my '93 9000 Aero had them, but I don't know if they did it any earlier). They also used the spark plug as a knock sensor, allowing their high output turbo engines to run on low octane fuel if needed. Turbo pressure was simply dialed back until no knock was happening. Of course, this meant less power, but it also meant you won't wreck an engine because you couldn't find (or didn't purchase) high octane fuel.

    As Corvallis mentioned, multiple sparks can be produced and timing can be very tightly controlled.

    ~Peter
    '89 325iX
    '04 9-5 Aero Combi

    Leave a comment:


  • CorvallisBMW
    replied
    All cars now days use COP; it's much less expensive than a distributor/rotor/wasted spark system as it requires no spark plug wires ("leads") and needs merely an ECU trigger to fire. Timing is very tightly controlled, often with 4 or 5 individual sparks firing off within the millisecond to ensure complete ignition and combustion. It also simplifies the construction on the engine and means only 1 part is needed (the COP) instead of a myriad of different parts doing different jobs (coil, rotor, distributor, etc)

    Leave a comment:


  • Massimo
    replied
    Originally posted by xworks View Post
    I don't know the percentages, but, if you pop the bonnet on most
    mass production cars these days you'll see a wasted spark
    coil setup. Individual coil on plugs (cop) seem to be reserved, for
    the most part, for high performance models. I've yet to learn what
    ,if any, performance advantage the coil on plug setup offers.
    I'd imagine theres some reason for it though, they seldom tend to
    do things for the craic.
    Not much really besides what was mention before about possible residue in the exhaust stroke. They also allow long charge time extending the life of the coil, apparently. The new BMW S65 has knock sensors build into each COP. The only other advantage is you never need to replace leads.

    The residure in the Exhaust stroke should not be a problem with a well designed engine. If you have designed your engine right you should have 100% burn at the end of the power stroke.

    Leave a comment:


  • xworks
    replied
    I don't know the percentages, but, if you pop the bonnet on most
    mass production cars these days you'll see a wasted spark
    coil setup. Individual coil on plugs (cop) seem to be reserved, for
    the most part, for high performance models. I've yet to learn what
    ,if any, performance advantage the coil on plug setup offers.
    I'd imagine theres some reason for it though, they seldom tend to
    do things for the craic.

    Leave a comment:


  • monoi
    replied
    Harley engines used to have wasted sparks, and it was a common mod to go single spark as apparently, burnt gases are not necessarily entirely burned and therefore you could have some more combustion on the way up which would not help.

    Thinking about it now, it sounds a bit far fetched.

    Leave a comment:

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