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Das Beast: My E30 track / street build

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  • Elysian
    replied
    Did cylinder 1 get capped off? Looks like there's a sliver of material over it in the flow bench section. I opened my step file in Fusion and it's not covered, just want to make sure.

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  • dvallis
    replied
    Well, THAT'S pretty weird. Here's a velocity plot. Cylinder #1 would be getting starved, not #6 Aaaaaannndddd ... that's why you need engineers designing manifolds. Yikes that's ugly. Glad we're using the stock manifold.



    I gave it an intake volume goal of 1000 cfm, which is in the ballpark for this head. I know it's not exact but close enough. Note that volume of air OUT equals volume of air air IN. Also shows there is virtually nothing flowing in cylinder #1.



    If you have Solidworks this is a pretty good CFD tutorial.
    Last edited by dvallis; 09-13-2019, 06:24 PM.

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  • Elysian
    replied
    Awesome. I have Solidworks (educational license for veterans), but having a hard time installing 2020 on my home PC, need to figure that out.

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  • dvallis
    replied
    #nevermind. I just added one myself. Now to get Solidworks flow simulation working.

    STEP file is here.



    Last edited by dvallis; 09-13-2019, 03:23 PM.

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  • dvallis
    replied
    That looks great. Actual runner ID is 1.38" so your design is spot on. Metal thickness looks fine.

    Could you add a throttle body inlet plate with 3 ID " tube? That's all it needs.



    Nice inside details by the way. Looks like the real thing.




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  • Elysian
    replied
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/xtmig2ixwt...ntake.stp?dl=0

    I didn't add the mount plate for the throttle body, and had to assume the diameter on the inlet tubes, as well as the thickness of the metal.

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  • dvallis
    replied
    Cool. Let's see your model. Post a STEP file and I should be able to import it to SolidWorks

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  • Elysian
    replied
    Originally posted by dvallis View Post
    Here's the inside of the plenum. No baffles or bell mouths. Slight raised lip on each runner.



    Dimensions to scale here. Would definitely be interesting to see some CFD.

    I made a 3d model based on your dimensions and some assumptions on things that are harder to measure, but I've never used Autodesk CFD and can't quite figure it out to flow test it...

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  • dvallis
    replied
    Here's the inside of the plenum. No baffles or bell mouths. Slight raised lip on each runner.



    Dimensions to scale here. Would definitely be interesting to see some CFD.


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  • ForcedFirebird
    replied
    Would you mind taking a pic of the inside of your intake manifold (the fabricated one)?

    Interested if there's horns or raised radii bell-mouths. If you take dimensions, ,Digger may be able to do some CFD for ya.



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  • dvallis
    replied
    Motor is back on its mounts



    Driveshaft, shifter, transmission mount etc. reattached



    Downpipe hooked up again.



    The intake manifold has been on my mind lately. Since we had to take everything off, I've been contemplating replacing it. Several of you, and even my tuner thought we =might= starve cylinder 6. Valid point. Can't know for sure without a flow bench or blowing up the engine on a dyno.



    I went down the Google rathole, looking for an off-the-shelf E30 turbo intake manifold. Believe it or not, besides these eBay hack jobs, there is is nothing out there.



    I've had this lump sitting on a table in the media room for a month. Found several posts here and elsewhere of guys making 500+ HP with it under boost. We know it flows pretty damn good (lots of posts out there on it) has nice runners and generally just works. Flow can be equalized and improved ~25% with extrude honing. See this post. Guy went from 190 to 240 cfm. But, that's $500 and I don't have a local supplier for the service. Soooooo .... we're going to use it. Better safe than sorry. Tuner will be happy.



    Taking it to Enigma tomorrow, along with the valve cover. They'll media blast and dual stage powder coat both. Should end up looking like this.

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  • dvallis
    replied
    Bottom of 3 piece oil ring got jammed and bent on piston 6. Had to wait for new ring set. It's important to keep even pressure on the ring compression tool against the head while sliding the piston in. Definitely a two man job. All done now.



    Snugging the rod end cap bolts before torquing them down. It's a freaking weird torque spec: "15 ft-lbs then then another 70 degrees" Ends up being about 50 ft-lbs per my digital torque wrench. Which makes more sense as the M10 spec is 40 ft-lbs.



    We trimmed the crank scraper to make installation and removal 100X easier, i.e. even frigging possible to clear the installed oil pump. Before anyone loses their mind, yes, we know. We only lose two of the 12 crank lobe scrapers right over the oil pan baffle. No big deal.



    We used a bit of spray tack to hold the bottom gasket to the oil pan. Scraper is being used to press everything down evenly.



    Oil pump and pressure relief valve in place



    Final installation process is (1) gasket on top of scraper, (2) hold those two against block, (3) maneuver oil pan with tacked gasket into place, (4) Turn, angle, rotate and slide it all into place. Then put in all the bolts. Torque everything. Whew. Bolts back by the clutch are a b@#$ to access. Requires a wrist with three joints. I was doing the final torquing and Robs says "It's Miller Time up here. Sucks to be you under there." LoL



    So, it's possible to do an entire engine job without pulling the block, removing the front end or steering rack. Just takes a couple of guys and lots of patience. Top end will go quick as we're just re-assembling not fixing, engineering or re-building anything. Pretty damn easy compared to what we just finished.
    Last edited by dvallis; 09-08-2019, 01:32 PM. Reason: typo

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  • dvallis
    replied
    No kidding. Back at it on Monday...

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  • Digitalwave
    replied
    Let's get this bitch tuned!!!

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  • dvallis
    replied
    Back at it this weekend. Installing the new rings.

    Measuring the ring gap. Using 0.018 for compression rings. 0.020 for scraper rings. Oil rings are gapped to 0.020 stock (we checked)


    Small adjustments. You can't un-gap rings


    Rings installed and clocked. Hastings have a 3 piece oil ring. Note the napier scraper, notch down. Compression rings are 'molly coated with a square profile. Can go either way.


    Ring compression tool. It's important to press this down hard against the block when sliding the pistons in. You don't want the rings to pop out.


    Piston installed. Valve reliefs are the right way :-)


    Installing rod caps. Note the oil pan mating surface still needs to be scraped.


    Repeat six times. We'll start on the head next week.

    In the meantime, clutch stop broke on the M5, so we made a new one. Two flat washers welded to a 3/8" carriage bolt.



    End product. Very solid.

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