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    replacing rear inner brake lines

    I tried searching a bit.... is there ANY POSSIBLE way of replacing these without dropping the rear subframe? I got all the outer lines on, and decided to wait until I do a rear end refresh to do the inners. I just couldnt figure out any other way or any other tool.

    #2
    Originally posted by JoeyBones View Post
    I tried searching a bit.... is there ANY POSSIBLE way of replacing these without dropping the rear subframe? I got all the outer lines on, and decided to wait until I do a rear end refresh to do the inners. I just couldnt figure out any other way or any other tool.
    review this at least to post #10
    http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/showthread.php?t=67812
    My CA legal M60 swap

    The happening in our garage

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      #3
      You don't have to remove it. I supported the diff on a floor jack and just lowered the subframe a few inches.
      Originally posted by Gruelius
      and i do not know what bugg brakes are.

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        #4
        Yes it can be done. Cut off the soft line at the fitting, use a flare wrench on the hard line side, and a deep six-point socket on the soft line side. Since this is an all or nothing endeavor, soak the fittings with PBlaster for several days before starting on the line replacement.
        The car makes it possible, but the driver makes it happen.
        Jim Levie, Huntsville, AL

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          #5
          Jim, that actually sounds like a great way...but how do you hold the new flexible line while tightening back together?

          Is that just where you slide the box wrench up over the line and try like hell to hold it?

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            #6
            Getting the joints separated is the hard part. It doesn't take much torque to connect the new soft line to the hard line.
            The car makes it possible, but the driver makes it happen.
            Jim Levie, Huntsville, AL

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              #7
              man...i sure wish i had seen this before bleeding the entire brake system... :(

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                #8
                Dropping subframe without removing

                Yay thread revival!

                Count me among all the others having a problem removing the brake hoses above the rear subframe. Not enough clearance for the crowfoot set I just purchased from Harbor Freight. Oy.

                Context: I'm planning on refurbing the entire suspension anyway - shocks, links, sway bushings, springs. If I remove the shocks and sway bar etc, will I be able to simply unbolt 1 side of the subframe and drop it an inch or two without much issue? I've seen this mentioned elsewhere, but it makes me nervous (previous owner replaced the subframe bushings, so I really want to avoid dropping the subframe if I don't have to). Obviously I would keep the diff supported with a floor jack the entire time.

                Basically, if I drop one end of the subframe a bit, do I still have to undo the driveshaft, parking brake cable, ABS cable, etc?

                Alternatively, if I opt to cut the line and use a deep well socket on the hose fitting (as others have suggested), what exactly do I use for the cutting? Since the clearance is so tight, I can't imagine getting my bolt cutters in there. Think a robust pair of garden hand shears would work?

                Thanks everyone!

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                  #9
                  you are cutting rubber hose so any sharp blade will do. Just cut as close to the ferrule as you can so your deep socket can still reach the the hex end
                  Deck Lid and soft top Shocks on hand

                  Seat shocks on hand for immediate shipment
                  https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...86#post4944786
                  Alice the Time Capsule
                  http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/showthread.php?t=360504
                  87 Zinno Cabrio barn find 98k and still smells like a barn. Build thread http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/show...20#post3455220

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by jeffnhiscars View Post
                    you are cutting rubber hose so any sharp blade will do. Just cut as close to the ferrule as you can so your deep socket can still reach the the hex end
                    Fair enough. I was just remembering when I cut off one of the other lines recently, and found it surprisingly robust. Used the bolt cutters then.

                    One additional question RE a subframe drop: where do I relocate my jack stands? Right in front of where the subframe bracket attaches to the side rail? That ubiquitous photo of the E30 jack points is a bit hard to decipher on that one...

                    Thanks again!

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                      #11
                      Don't mess with trying to drop the subframe. Have you already done bushings on your car? If not it is highly unlikely it will drop anyways and at that point you should probably just replace the bushings. Get a new razor blade for your knife cut it off at the fitting and then make sure to have a really precise crows foot on the hard line. I bought Kobalt wrenches from Lowes and they seemed strong and precise. The last thing you want to do is strip that hard line.
                      1989 325i LS Swap (Money Pit):https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=244933
                      COTM Feb 2019: https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=428404

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Pootis View Post
                        Don't mess with trying to drop the subframe. Have you already done bushings on your car? If not it is highly unlikely it will drop anyways and at that point you should probably just replace the bushings. Get a new razor blade for your knife cut it off at the fitting and then make sure to have a really precise crows foot on the hard line. I bought Kobalt wrenches from Lowes and they seemed strong and precise. The last thing you want to do is strip that hard line.
                        Right, thanks for the tip. I think you're right: dropping the subframe is a last resort. But rather than buy another set of crowfoot wrenches I think I'll just go the deep well socket route as others have suggested. The hose isn't rusty (see the pic: my baby spent most of her life below the Salt Belt, thankfully, and I've never driven her in the snow). Fingers crossed...

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                          #13
                          The line wrench is for the hardline side. The deepwell goes on the soft line side after it is cut. I would not use a regular wrench end on the hardline side
                          1989 325i LS Swap (Money Pit):https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=244933
                          COTM Feb 2019: https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=428404

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                            #14
                            WOW. Glad it's finished.

                            Update: So I went ahead with the replacement today, and it really kinda sucked. I'm sure that at least 50% of my trouble stems from my inexperience and ineptitude, but holy christ it was an annoying job. Just in case anyone else finds this thread when they're thinking of attempting this, allow me to offer some pointers:

                            1. Wear decent eye protection. The cheap safety glasses that I had (those big clunky ones from high school chem lab) would fog up immediately, and it seemed like every time I shifted them up to see I got a drop of brake fluid IN MY G-DAMN EYE. Seriously, happened like 4 times. It sucks. Invest in a pair of decent swim goggles or something...

                            2. As others have said: Soak fittings with your favorite penetrant oil once a day for several days prior, just to be safe.

                            3. I used a pair of pruning shears to cut the hose. Worked like a charm. Just try to get as much of the rubber off as possible so the deep well socket will fit. Obviously, use an 11mm flare wrench on the hard line fitting as you unscrew the remainder of the hose.

                            4. I had a pretty steady brake fluid drip from the snipped line, and it makes everything slippery and it sucks. Work quickly but carefully.

                            5. I ran into a bit of trouble on the passenger side when installing the new hose. Basically, I accidentally pushed the hard line fitting back away from the junction without realizing it, and so the new hose just spun and spun and spun without biting. Panicked, I inspected what the heck was going on, and found the flare wrench was now surrounding the threads that I had been trying to get a bite on, and the brass nut and hard line had essentially disappeared under the edge of the gas tank. Since I still could see the flared end of the hard line, I took a pair of needle nosed pliers and yanked the whole fitting back toward the hose, held it in place, and was finally able to get it to bite. This was my period of peak frustration.

                            6. Since I'm refurbing several areas at once, I did this with my catback removed, and I imagine that made a huge difference. Having the car on a lift also would have made this much easier.

                            7. Once I got the hose screwed in, I would cap it with a vacuum cap so that I could remove the lower end of the old hose without more brake fluid leaking from the new hose.

                            8. As others have said, torquing the new hose is rather easy - just hold the hose and tighten the hard line nut with a flare wrench until it is essentially hand-tight. I then (carefully) grabbed onto the new hose fitting with a pair of thin pliers and torqued the nut slightly more for good measure.

                            That's about it. I'm kind of a dumbass, learn-as-you-go-type of DIY mechanic, so I'm sure there was a better way to go about this mess, but at least it's done (and no hard line damage). Feels so good to cross this off the list.

                            Hope this is helpful!

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                              #15
                              This is good info. I am approaching this job soon and appreciate the advice.


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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