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Project Weißer Regen: 91 318iS Restomod

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    Nice work.

    Whats the trick to keep the plating out of the brake caliper bore?

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      Why would you want to keep plating out of the bore? Plating is super super thin, and provides unparalleled corrosion resistance, and lubricity.

      The last set I did for the red car were plated and had no issues.

      Hers 13 X3 375hp/450tq - His 14 M5 780hp/730tq

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        Originally posted by Jordan View Post
        Why would you want to keep plating out of the bore? Plating is super super thin, and provides unparalleled corrosion resistance, and lubricity.

        The last set I did for the red car were plated and had no issues.
        Because BMW machines the bore and o-ring groove after plating. I thought you were a perfectionist? :p

        Comment


          How do you know what all of those bolts and screws go to? You must know this chassis like the back of your hand...


          '91 318is - Aluminum block M52/ZF/Torsen 3.15 and fresh paint
          '05 330Ci ZHP 6MT - DD
          '03.5 Mazdaspeed Protege - Sold
          '91 318i Sterling Silver project - Sold :sad:
          '91 325i auto coupe - Sold
          '90 325iC - Sold
          '91 318i - Project/dead engine- Sold

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            Damn that's crazy seeing all of those bolts, nut and washers together.
            When I plated all my hardware for my 2002 Touring I laid everything on a big A3 paper and wrote down where it came from. So when I got everything back from plating I could lay the parts on the paper and know where it needs to go.

            Can't wait to see further updates!
            1990 325iX Touring - November 2018 R3V Car Of The Month

            1980 Volkswagen Golf mk1 1.1
            1974 BMW 2002 Touring

            Instagram

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              Yeah, I've worked on and built enough E30's I have no worried about putting it back together with the right hardware where it belongs. What really adds to the complication is that I had the host vehicle, and I had an identical donor. I saved all the hardware from both, discarded a few obviously damaged (tool marks etc) pieces, but in general... I have 2x quantity of everything. All of the bolts from the bad transmission are in there too so those will all be shiny new as well.

              When everything comes back from plating I will organize by fastener type, length etc into little bins so at least I have it broke up a little.

              Hers 13 X3 375hp/450tq - His 14 M5 780hp/730tq

              Comment


                Another fun filled day of bead blasting. I made it completely through the "holes" bin before managing to blast a hold in my off hand glove. The beads don't really hurt hitting my finger, but the glove fills with gritty glass pretty quick lol. Cabinet is down for the count until I can replace the glove.

                I moved the calipers to their own bin, and continued filling this one. Coming right along.



                With the cabinet mostly sorta down I moved from blast heavy project to some smaller detail work.

                I've never had the rear brake proportioning valve open before, and the nicer one I have was plugged, not passing shop air... so I decided to open it up, break it down, and clean it up. I cleaned and bagged the internals, freed up the ball valve, and then blasted the exterior case for plating.



                Moving on to a couple of turds I've been kicking around for a few weeks, the better set of the four front hubs. These came off the parts car that has been standing for the last 10 years, the ones from the flood car looked a little worse and one felt a bit gritty.

                I decided rather than buy two new ones at ~155ea I'd take these good feeling used ones and rebuild them. It seems like not long ago these were closer to $50/ea but like everything... they are going up.

                The one on the left obviously disassembled and partially blasted.



                All cleaned of the old shitty white grease and ready to rebuild. Seriously though, the original grease is terrible, and not much of it is used either. Both of these units were not original to the car and had been replaced at some point in its life because the grease was still whitish yellow. Take apart an old original bearing and what grease is left will be brown, thick, and caked up.



                Both wheel hubs awaiting repacking, the one on the left I burnished with steel wool to bring back some luster after blasting, emulating the new finish. The one on the right will be done next.




                Everything laid out for one bearing assembly, cleaned and dried of solvents that could contaminate the new grease.



                Wheel hub packed full of nice new Redline CV2 grease. No points awarded here for neatness, get it in there and be generous.



                Plastic cage dropped in place.



                Pack the cage full.



                Snap the ball bearings in place, extra grease should splooge out around them.



                Insert the rear radial seal, grease the inner race, and pack a bit more grease on over the ball bearings before snapping the race in place.



                Done with the back side, now to flip over.



                I'll save you the front as the process is the same.

                All done, a nicely refreshed well packed FAG.


                Hers 13 X3 375hp/450tq - His 14 M5 780hp/730tq

                Comment


                  Did know you could buy rebuilds for the front hubs thought you just replaced them


                  1989 325is l 1984 euro 320i l 1970 2002 Racecar
                  1991 318i 4dr slick top


                  Euro spec 320i/Alpina B6 3.5 project(the never ending saga)
                  Vintage race car revival (2002 content)
                  Mtech 2 turbo restoration
                  Brilliantrot slick top "build"

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                    I'm guessing as they felt good, Jordan just popped them apart and cleaned them out, did the blasting and reassembled the original bearings. I'd hope so since the outer race is there in all the pictures.

                    Comment


                      good way to save a few dollars on parts at the expense of time if you ask me.

                      time has value, but it doesn't really cost anything.
                      sigpic
                      Gigitty Gigitty!!!!

                      88 cabrio becoming alpina b6 3.5s transplanted s62
                      92 Mtech 2 cabrio alpinweiss 770 code
                      88 325ix coupe manual lachsilber/cardinal
                      88 325ix coupe manual diamondschwartz/natur
                      87 e30 m3 for parts lachsilber/cardinal(serial number 7)
                      12 135i M sport cabrio grey/black

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                        Indeed, nothing replaced here except the grease. I took two good working units and repacked them with premium grease. Repacking wheel bearings used to be very common place, as a maintenance item. Now everyone just runs parts into the ground and replaces them outright.

                        I also took the opportunity to mask and blast the hubs to recondition them cosmetically. Total time for both invested was about an hour and a half maybe.

                        Hers 13 X3 375hp/450tq - His 14 M5 780hp/730tq

                        Comment


                          Are you going to leave them bare metal or protect them with paint/clear?
                          1990 325iX Touring - November 2018 R3V Car Of The Month

                          1980 Volkswagen Golf mk1 1.1
                          1974 BMW 2002 Touring

                          Instagram

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                            I've left them bare metal as they were from the factory. I did wipe them down with gun oil though to ensure they won't flash rust anytime soon.

                            Hers 13 X3 375hp/450tq - His 14 M5 780hp/730tq

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by e30sh View Post
                              Because BMW machines the bore and o-ring groove after plating. I thought you were a perfectionist? :p
                              Actually they don't.

                              I bought brand new ATE rear calipers and the entirety of the assembly was plated, including the bore and seal lip. I disassembled the calipers to replace a melted dust boot and upon inspection, it was apparent that it was machined then plated afterwards.

                              Originally posted by whysimon
                              WTF is hello Kitty (I'm 28 with no kids and I don't have cable)

                              Comment


                                FYI, you can put too much grease into a bearing. The extra grease causes increased drag which heats the bearing up and makes it fail prematurely. This isn't really an issue on bearings that see low speeds, but on higher speed bearings like machine spindles, it's a must to put the right amount of grease in. Not sure if a wheel bearing sees a high enough of a speed to matter. Probably not.

                                Some good info here:

                                http://www.skf.com/us/products/beari...ill/index.html

                                Edit: More on this. Give a stock tire size of 185/65-14 with a rolling radius of 298mm (taken from e30zone.net), at 60 mph the wheels would be turning at 625 RPM.
                                Last edited by AndrewBird; 12-05-2017, 07:53 AM.

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