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    #16
    Originally posted by flyboyx View Post
    I think you made a good choice going this route. i am kinda surprised that you purchased the parts off ebay when they are so readily availible to you locally.

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/scz/spo...935428322.html

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/zip...935314644.html

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/for...934989502.html

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/spo...928302480.html

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/spo...934834173.html

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/spo...934758782.html

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/spo...934063194.html

    Andrew: to be clear, i used a 1/7hp motor on my mini lathe. bmwman is correct. treadmills have motors that are in excess of 1 horsepower but the comparison to an induction motor is not equal. the DC version makes so much more torque. this is why they are used in treadmill applications in the first place. think of some 400 lb fat fucker jumping on that thing trying to walk up a 6 degree incline.....
    You are correct that I could DIY part-out a treadmill. There is a reason why entire treadmills are so cheap. It would cost north of $200 to have junk haulers take it out of your house. I don't need a half-disassembled treadmill on my property...I have already spent a lot of money to de-junk my house over the last few years!

    Also, the eBay seller apparently dropped the box on the way to FedEx and broke the controller or something. I have asked them to cancel the order, so I will keep an eye out for other setups. At the same time, I am still thinking about the $$$ BLDC setup since the controllers have braking functionality, reversing for occasions when I need to extract broken shit, closed loop speed control, and the external PSU can run on 240V input which would allow me to keep the $30 NEMA twist lock plug on the cord I made for the drill press (despite the BLDC setup costing way more than $30).

    Anyway, I am still looking to see if any good treadmill setups are around online.
    Last edited by bmwman91; 07-17-2019, 10:12 PM.

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      #17
      in my area, i could just set the detrius out by the street and some metal scrap hauler would make it disappear in less than 3 hours.

      all of the features you are looking for are availible for brushed permenant magnet motors. the DC control box i have on my little lathe in the video i posted above has brake functionality. watch the video again and take a good look at the controls on the box. i didn't bother hooking it up. i couldn't imagine a good use for this feature on my drill press. since you switched over to a hand tightened chuck, i guess i could see how it might come in handy for you. personally, i am going to stay with a keyed chuck for my drill press. in my experience, i don't think the convienience of hand tightening offsets the greater tightening ability(leverage) a traditional chuck provides.

      an option for you in liu of a braking feature would be to add something to the spindle pulley on the top of your machine that you can easily lock in place or perhaps some sort of handle you can hold with one hand while tightening the chuck with your other hand.

      as to reverse, the motor is DC. all you have to do is swap the power leads to the motor and it will run backwards. a simple separate switch would take care of that just fine.


      the twist lock plug is a really cool feature, but you do realize you are going to spend another 300 bucks in order to save 30?

      i understand that you are probably looking at this project as a forever tool. there is someting to be said about cool projects that don't make economic sense. i'm pretty sure you are going to have over 600.00 invested in this tool if you decide to use something other than a tread motor. that is easily 2x the value you would ever hope to recoup.
      Last edited by flyboyx; 07-18-2019, 05:00 AM.
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        #18
        Useless post, but I didn't there was such a thing as a brushless dc motor. I thought all brushless motors were AC, and the speed controller converted it to ac.

        Learn something new every day.
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          #19
          Nice job!

          I inherited a Delta 17-900 of about the same vintage from my woodworking neighbor. How did you find out what year it was made? I see yours is also Taiwanese.

          I like the old vintage machinery, also have 1987 Ohio Forge 510-440 table top DP, 1955 Delta Toolmaker, a 70's Sioux Valve grinding station, 1983 Miller Syncrowave etc...
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            #20
            Originally posted by flyboyx View Post
            in my area, i could just set the detrius out by the street and some metal scrap hauler would make it disappear in less than 3 hours.

            all of the features you are looking for are availible for brushed permenant magnet motors. the DC control box i have on my little lathe in the video i posted above has brake functionality. watch the video again and take a good look at the controls on the box. i didn't bother hooking it up. i couldn't imagine a good use for this feature on my drill press. since you switched over to a hand tightened chuck, i guess i could see how it might come in handy for you. personally, i am going to stay with a keyed chuck for my drill press. in my experience, i don't think the convienience of hand tightening offsets the greater tightening ability(leverage) a traditional chuck provides.

            an option for you in liu of a braking feature would be to add something to the spindle pulley on the top of your machine that you can easily lock in place or perhaps some sort of handle you can hold with one hand while tightening the chuck with your other hand.

            as to reverse, the motor is DC. all you have to do is swap the power leads to the motor and it will run backwards. a simple separate switch would take care of that just fine.


            the twist lock plug is a really cool feature, but you do realize you are going to spend another 300 bucks in order to save 30?

            i understand that you are probably looking at this project as a forever tool. there is someting to be said about cool projects that don't make economic sense. i'm pretty sure you are going to have over 600.00 invested in this tool if you decide to use something other than a tread motor. that is easily 2x the value you would ever hope to recoup.
            You are correct that this is mostly a "cool factor" project, and I am 100% unconcerned about future resale value or recouping costs. I am already more than the original cost/value of this thing into it from the rebuild and keyless chuck. I still have the keyed chuck for it for the times when I am dealing with high torque operations like large hole saws and drilling steel plate, but the keyless is just fine and super fast for the other 90% of the stuff I do on it.

            Braking functionality is mostly for frequent start-stop operations when I need to reposition a workpiece (or swap them) many times and don't want to do it with a 2" Forstner bit rotating near my fingers. I also often am in a situation where I need to do multiple holes in a part, starting with a pilot hole, then the actual hole and then countersink and/or tap it. To maintain concentricity, it is best done one hole at a time, swapping bits, and waiting for the spindle to stop on its own takes forever.

            Originally posted by Exodus_2pt0 View Post
            Useless post, but I didn't there was such a thing as a brushless dc motor. I thought all brushless motors were AC, and the speed controller converted it to ac.

            Learn something new every day.
            Yup! They are not actually DC motors in any similar sense as a brushed motor, except that the main power supply is DC. The controllers modulate the DC voltage into 3 phase trapezoidal or sinusoidal signals. The motor's stator windings interact with permanent magnets on the rotor to spin it.

            Originally posted by ForcedFirebird View Post
            Nice job!

            I inherited a Delta 17-900 of about the same vintage from my woodworking neighbor. How did you find out what year it was made? I see yours is also Taiwanese.

            I like the old vintage machinery, also have 1987 Ohio Forge 510-440 table top DP, 1955 Delta Toolmaker, a 70's Sioux Valve grinding station, 1983 Miller Syncrowave etc...
            I am just guessing on the year based on the manuals for it I found online. I do sort of like some of the older woodworking tools more than the newer ones since they seem to have a lot more cast iron in them.

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              #21
              OK, attempt #2 to do this with a treadmill motor on the cheap'ish. Back when I researched this a bunch a year or so ago, I found that KB / Nidec make decent DC motor drives which are reasonably priced on eBay. My inclination was to go with a KBPW-240D which is one of their PWM drives, but it has some power limitations with 90-130VDC motors and a couple of other missing features. So I went with the KBPC-225D SCR drive which has speed- and torque-control drive modes and can handle a lot more output current. All in all, this ran me $5 more than the first all-treadmill-parts eBay item which fell through, and in this case I have basically everything I need to run this out of the box. I can even maintain my 240V input too and just set the drive's MAX trimpot to not go much over 130VDC. As far as I can tell, it does NOT include dynamic braking functionality, which is something like $100 worth of accessory add-ons. I may just come up with a mechanical brake system since I will be machining custom pulleys and motor adapter brackets.

              Other than that, I am still planning on making a microcontroller-based tach with some big 7-segment LED blocks.



              https://www.ebay.com/itm/KB-ELECTRON...X/233290854397

              https://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-Perman...d/173955411743

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                #22
                That’s really cool man. So that controller was around 200 bucks? Not cheap, but I think it will serve you well. I found my lathe controller on eBay too. Apparently the guy selling it found it at an estate sale. I bought it used, but it had never been installed before. The specs say it’s made for 1/8 to 1 hp. Apparently 45.00 shipped was a pretty good deal.

                I am thinking about a way to make it modular so I can run my 1960’s craftsman press with it too. I guess I won’t find another that cheap.


                I see there is a spot on the panel for brake. It’s a shame you don’t have that feature in your price point.
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                88 cabrio becoming alpina b6 3.5s transplanted s62
                92 Mtech 2 cabrio alpinweiss 770 code
                88 325ix coupe manual lachsilber/cardinal
                88 325ix coupe manual diamondschwartz/natur
                87 e30 m3 for parts lachsilber/cardinal(serial number 7)
                12 135i M sport cabrio grey/black

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                  #23
                  Yeah $155 shipped seemed pretty good for new commercial-grade DC motor drive box. Agreed, it is too bad that none of them come with the brake accessory, but I will keep an eye out for a deal on one. Chances are that once I put in pulleys with a LOT less mass, the spindle will come to a stop much more quickly. The stock main spindle pulley has to be north of 5lbs, and close to 10" in diameter at its largest. It probably helps to smooth the operation a little, similar to a flywheel in a car.


                  We'll see how it does. It is an SCR-type drive, so there is the inherent RFI that will be generated, and the motor will be a bit noisier with the 120Hz fundamental harmonic from the chopping action. I am still hopeful that it will run quieter than the TEFC induction motor that is on there now.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    OK, so does anyone on here want to buy the DC motor control and 2 working DC motors from me?

                    - The first one which I got on eBay had a worn bearing, so I am replacing both of them. The new bearings are high quality NTN double-sealed ones from Motion Industries, which I should have in a week or so.

                    - I then bought a second one (see Surplus Center link) which is "new". I disassembled it to get some measurements on it (too large a diameter for even my 12" caliper jaws) and found that one of the internal permanent magnets was cracked. I pulled out the small loose piece, and there are some larger bits which appear to still be glued into place. Once I got the chipped bits out and reassembled, it runs fine and does not make crunching noises or anything...seems to be fine.
                    https://www.surpluscenter.com/Electr...-10-3048-A.axd

                    - The motor control is brand new and in immaculate condition. Apparently this model does not have a braking module accessory option. That alone wouldn't be a deal breaker on the whole project, but the motors I bought irk me.

                    Anyway, both of the DC motors are about as loud as the AC induction motor on the press now, and my OCD is triggered by these surplus goods lol. I'll sell all 3 items for $200 shipped (everything, including nice new ball bearings, were $330 with shipping when I got them). Let me know if you are interested before I plop it all on Craigslist.




                    So, WAT DO NOW? BLDC motor conversion, that is what. Yes, I have just wasted a really good bottle of Scotch's worth of money figuring out how I don't want to do this. Also, yes, the BLDC parts are another chunk of mostly-unnecessary change. Compared to what I, and many of us here, have done with our 30 year old cars, I feel no guilt. YOLO

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