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  • bmwm3n528
    replied
    Originally posted by Rob
    haha like your car trev?


    couldnt resist
    Wait 'til spring...maybe then it'll be track worthy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rob
    replied
    haha like your car trev?


    couldnt resist

    Leave a comment:


  • bmwm3n528
    replied
    Another good point that you may think about is...if you know of something that may be on it's last limb, and you can't afford to replace it, don't bother throwing it on the track and testing it's limits.

    Or atleast this is what i've heard...not from past experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bavarian3
    replied
    I tracked (my first track day actually) my 86 325e with 200k+ miles on it at Sebring with some Goodyear GSCS tires. It was great... just needed some extra hp for the vettes. It was a two day school as well...

    Leave a comment:


  • OreoGaborio
    replied
    Originally posted by Oxbrain
    I'd mostly just be worried about my engine blowing up since it's got 200k miles on it.
    if you're smooth it won't put much more stress on it than spirited daily driving

    Leave a comment:


  • Oxbrain
    replied
    I'd mostly just be worried about my engine blowing up since it's got 200k miles on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackcoatknight
    replied
    Thanks alot I knew alot about most of that stuff but a new e30 owner like myself needs to hear it from anther person just to take some of the scare away from that first track day...

    Leave a comment:


  • OreoGaborio
    replied
    Ebert, Roper & Gaboriault give it :up: :up: :up:

    Leave a comment:


  • Low Level E30
    replied
    Great post - thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • DBurke
    started a topic So you want to attend a track event...

    So you want to attend a track event...

    To those who are track regulars just humor me, you already know this, or should.

    I was inspired to write this after reading some posts here earlier.

    So you want to come on out to a DE, HPDE, BMWCCA school etc., etc. If you haven't done this before its the most punishment that you are going to put your car through. I don't care where or how you drive on the street. This is just a heads up.

    Car Prep
    If you think that something mechanical isn't 100% just replace it. It will be less expensive in the long run. Your car should be in top running condition.
    Brakes
    A properly functioning stock system is fine. What do you think EVERY SCCA IT/SE30 in the country has on it? You should have recent brake fluid, freshly bled, no more than 3 months old, it should be clean and of a high performance variety. The Valvoline that is available at most auto part stores is fairly decent. If you want the right answer for fluid from the start, Bimmerworld has the PFC, Redline, Castrol and Motul fluid any of which are as good as it gets. Pads, if you have "no-name" brake pads on your car make sure you have a lot of pad left, more than 75%. A good racing pad is the right answer for a good day on track. I currently only recommend PFC and Cobalt Friction pads. Call/email Bimmerworld for PFC and Cobalt for their recommended compounds for your application. Don't order blindly. SS lines are a luxury, not a necessity but a good thought seeing as your car qualifies for antique plates these days.
    Engine
    Engine oil should be a recent change. Run premium products, not here to debate dino/synth but run a brand name performance oil. Cooling hoses and upper/lower radiator inlet/outlet, check these, they are a common failure point, they blow off, break etc. This makes coolant go on the ground (thats where your tires are) and then you or the guy behind you run over it and bad things happen. If you have wires everywhere from some half-wit project from three years ago, clean it up, some aggro middle management tech inspector is just looking to fail you. Check accessory drive belts and bring a spare. Also, check the mounting bolts on all accessory brackets, these like to leave, it has happened to me.
    Tires
    Are they round, black and hold air? You are all set. Just make sure you don't show up with some dry rotted something or other, you won't pass tech. Lets go with at least a V speed rating. There are tons of options for cheap nowadays, Falken, Dunlop and Hankook offer good HPDE street tires.
    Interior
    If you've got some bump, leave it at home. Take all the loose misc stuff out. You will find all the change in the car the first time that you brake for the corner after the longest straightaway. Don't buy those rally belts, stockers are fine for now and don't use a harness if you don't have a roll bar. Clean your windows.
    Other
    The switch that turns on your brake lights is cheap, if it dies you don't drive, you want to have a spare on hand, I now do.
    Fuses, if they are as old as the car you might want to think about having some spares on hand.
    Wheel torque, I go for 90 ft/lbs, make sure they won't fall off but anything above 100 is way overkill. Torque lugs in a star pattern.

    At the track
    OK, you are there, ready to get down and since Mr. Penske is in the trees you are going to be in Indycar in No Time!!! There isn't anyone looking for new talent at any DE so check the ego and open the mind. Remember 2 eyes, 2 ears and one mouth.
    Bring the assorted tools you may need, a quart or 2 of oil, tire changing tools, torque wrench, pressure gauge, brake fluid, tarp, window cleaning suff, paper towels, duct tape or "racer's tape" some zip ties, anything else you like to have with you. Keep your things in a tote, one with a top that is removable, not the fold open/close type, water leaks in with those.
    Tires/wheels, bump up air pressure, ~35 lbs cold works for most street tires. Shoot for 40-42 hot. The letters on the side are for identification not traction, bear this in mind. Check wheel torque a couple times throughout the day, not while the lugs are hot.
    Engine, make sure that all fluids are full and no leaks appeared on the way to the track. This is a good reason to keep a CLEAN engine compartment. Check oil before EVERY run group, top off if necessary.
    Interior, empty everything out, no loose objects.
    Brakes, if you haven't bled, do it now. You did bring those tools, right? Brake pedal should be a firm and confidence inspiring.
    Go to every classroom session.
    Ride along with instructors and watch the well driven cars in the faster groups, not just the fast cars. Listen to the footwork, watch different lines, learn from watching.
    Make sure car is warm/up to temperature before heading out on track.

    Don't forget about taking care of the driver. Drink plenty of water or your favorite sports drink, stay hydrated, maintain throughout the day. Eat good stuff for you, go for the grilled chicken before the chili dog, the apple before the french fries. Or don't temp yourself, bring your food with. I highly recommend this, you will have what you want, when you want it and you won't be paying "track food" prices, that leaves you money for gas on the way home as well as all the stuff you just used up on track, pads, rotors, tires, etc. If you intend on doing this frequently, get yourself in shape. A good total body program is fine but, the key is cardio, every top pro runs for DAYS, the mental focus to accomplish a long run is similar to the focus required to pilot your car around the track well. You don't have to be an Olympian, but think about it...

    On track
    Relax, this is fun remember.
    Check ego.
    Eyes up! Look for flaggers.
    Listen to your instructor, he/she is THE BOSS.
    Build your speed progressively.
    The LAST place to look for speed is under braking. If you sense your brakes fading, BACK OFF, stay out there just take it easy. Run laps without using the brakes at all, great exercise.
    Communicate what is going on with your car to your instructor.

    On the way home
    Take numbers off car and remember that you are NOT on the racetrack. My Mom is out there.

    You'll notice that I didn't mention anything about any modifications. Here is the rule if you are going to become a track junkie and you want to spend your day driving and not wrenching. Only upgrade/change parts that are going to make your car more durable for track use. Get some good tires, you don't have to go R compound but some good hi-po street tires. Make sure your brake system is at 100%, run some good pads and fluid, as mentioned above. If you are going to play with suspesion that is fine, just make sure that all your bushings etc. are there/functioning/not blown out before you dump $1500+ on some super-jammy go-fast trick of the week setup. Motor, outside of a chip and making sure its in top running conditon, leave it alone.

    Look at what the instructors drive. Yes, their cars are more expensive and faster than yours, thats because you'll find the wealthiest people at racetracks around the world (why are they all men). If they are not driving some sort of a racecar the car they are driving will (at least in New England) have a stock-ish brake system, Hoosiers, mildly upgraded suspension and a pretty much stock with the exception of a chip/intake motor. That's because all the super-jammy go-fast trick of the week stuff doesn't make you all that much faster, really. Yes, we all want to go fast, but we're out there trying to learn and be competent first. Your driving should be completely intuitive and natural. No hunting for shifter and pedals, if you are, you need more time just driving that car.
    Last edited by DBurke; 10-23-2015, 05:16 AM. Reason: 'Cause I can
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