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Coilovers - Good or Bad for resale?

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    #16
    People who will pay money for these cars want stock-ish.

    Coilovers that suck will have a negative impact. Coilovers that don’t suck will cost too much.
    2006 GMC Sierra 2500HD 4WD LBZ/Allison
    2002 BMW M3 Alpinweiß/Black
    1999 323i GTS2 Alpinweiß
    1995 M3 Dakargelb/Black
    - S50B32/S6S420G/3.91
    1990 325is Brilliantrot/Tan
    1989 M3 Alpinweiß/Black

    Hers: 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo Black/Black
    Hers: 1988 325iX Coupe Diamantschwartz/Black 5spd

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      #17
      ^Yes.

      When I see BC (or eq.) coil-overs mentioned, I automatically reduce any $ offer by the cost of replacement stock struts/springs.
      ADAMS Autosport

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        #18
        I'll throw another vote for either stock replacement or the Billy sport kit.

        Even if you will full Moton coilovers on the car, it's still not going to increase the resale value of your car.

        Now if it was a track oriented build out or racecar, then yes, it would affect the perceived value of the car. It's all about knowing your crowd:

        -If you're trying to sell it as mostly stock, the guys with the money in that audience want "STOCK", anything else counts against it.

        -If you're trying to sell it to the stance or low-low, bottom out on a Pop Tart crowd, the guys with the money in that group are expecting A LOT of customization being done on the car (as witnessed in recent BAT auctions and your average custom car/drama queen shows on Discovery)

        -If you're trying to sell to the track day/hillclimb/race car crowd, the money guys are going to want the proven race car stuff: GC or better coils, uprated brakes and bushings, safety improvements (all the way to roll cage and log book) and freshness of motor rebuild. As well as history and/or receipts on who and when the work was done.

        Again - target an audience, and shoot for that target. No car can be everything to everyone. That's why sometimes you have multiple cars to do specific things.
        1984 Alpina B6 2.8/1 #35
        1991 325i MT2 Touring (JDM bro)
        1991 Racecar (Chase Schmidt's former drift car - M30)
        2006 BMW X3
        2011 Audi A3 - wife's other German car

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          #19
          The least amount of money that you can spend with the greatest reward (or least penalty) is to get the car stockish. I don’t think you’d get any return on springs and shocks that are “upgraded.” The most bang for your buck is probably a set of Sachs or Bilstein Touring replacements.

          Edit: Keep in mind that a maintained stock suspension is now very rare. They are usually modified or fucked.
          2006 GMC Sierra 2500HD 4WD LBZ/Allison
          2002 BMW M3 Alpinweiß/Black
          1999 323i GTS2 Alpinweiß
          1995 M3 Dakargelb/Black
          - S50B32/S6S420G/3.91
          1990 325is Brilliantrot/Tan
          1989 M3 Alpinweiß/Black

          Hers: 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo Black/Black
          Hers: 1988 325iX Coupe Diamantschwartz/Black 5spd

          sigpic

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            #20
            Originally posted by nrubenstein View Post
            Edit: Keep in mind that a maintained stock suspension is now very rare. They are usually modified AND fucked.
            Fixed that last Edit
            Jimmy P.
            87 E30 M3 Prodrive British Touring Car
            88 E30 M3 Zinnoberot - Garage Queen
            88 E30 M3 Lachsilber - SCCA SPU #98
            92 M Technic Cabrio - S14 Powered!
            98 318Ti Morea Green
            04 Ford F350 Dually Tow Machine

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              #21
              Go back to almost stock. Firm and 15” wheels at most. I’m 49 and i bought my son (16) an ‘87 eta and I got myself an ‘89i. Both are stock survivors and both were bought for $5k each. I would have never ever paid any more for any car that was altered, but, I’m an old guy that knows what a stock e30 drives like and I know how nice they can be as your daily car.

              Disclosure though. 3 years ago I had zero e30 in my life and I had no idea how much they are treasured. I had one in the ‘90’s and early ‘00’s. Having gotten back into one, I do know why they are treasured. They are treasured as one of the pinnacle analog driving cars. If you make it too “racecar” or too, dare I say it, “rice” or “stanced”, you are eliminating a large target customer. These cars are treasured because of the way they were engineered and built. I’d argue that no car newer than 1991 is built of the same quality. Take it back to an updated stock and anyone who knows any better will recognize what it is worth and be happy to claim it.

              IMHO, an e30 is what every car enthusiast wants. Superior NVH, analog instruments, solid handling, easy to work on. Don’t eff it up.
              My son has the 1987 325e, 2 door, 5speed
              I daily the 1989 325i, 4 door, 5speed

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