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Do you <3 electric cars ?

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    #16
    dont like. i like my carbon footprint and all the noise i generate making it.

    Originally posted by ApexGoblin
    well make sure your priorities are straight... e30 first :up:

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      #17
      Originally posted by Ryan Stewart View Post
      Hydrogen.
      It's obvious that both battery technology and hydrogen storage+electrolysis processes need to be improved before they become real options. but when they do I will still choose electric.
      A hydrogen car is still going to have the cams, valves, pistons, rings, exhaust system, precise machining and molding for engine components, lubrication system etc. and will still require a transmisison to keep things in the narrow torque curve of an internal combustion engine. The electric motor for a Tesla weighs only 70 LBS is essentially has 1 rotating part, and does not need a transmission. The current batteries are heavy obviously, but they are bound to become smaller and lighter and allow for more power.



      vs.

      Last edited by Sagaris; 08-12-2011, 09:50 AM.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Sagaris View Post
        I do. I wouldn't miss doing timing belt changes, fixing intake, exhaust, and oil leaks, replacing worn sensors or pretty much any sort of repairs you might need.

        I would miss looking and listening to the engineering marvel that is the IC engine, but electric motors kick their trash in every other regard.

        Just waiting for battery technology to catch up.
        You're right, go electric. You'll NEVER have any problems I'm sure. ;)
        BimmerHeads
        Classic BMW Specialists
        Santa Clarita, CA

        www.BimmerHeads.com

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          #19
          Originally posted by MR 325 View Post
          You're right, go electric. You'll NEVER have any problems I'm sure. ;)
          I have an electric lawnmower from 1996. Original lead-acid battery lasted until 2009. While it wouldn't be the best choice for a huge yard, I certainly do not miss "winterizing" a mower, changing the oil, plug, cleaning and adjusting the carb, valve adjustment etc. Sure, all that stuff is really easy, but sometimes I just want the mower to start consistently so I can mow the lawn and be done with it instead of pulling the carb apart because it doesn't want to start.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Sagaris View Post
            On the bright side, this mess will provide jobs at the dealer service dept for years to come. Why do electric cars hate America?

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              #21
              Originally posted by Sagaris View Post
              It's obvious that both battery technology and hydrogen storage+electrolysis processes need to be improved before they become real options. but when they do I will still choose electric.
              A hydrogen car is still going to have the cams, valves, pistons, rings, exhaust system, precise machining and molding for engine components, lubrication system etc. and will still require a transmisison to keep things in the narrow torque curve of an internal combustion engine. The electric motor for a Tesla weighs only 70 LBS is essentially has 1 rotating part, and does not need a transmission. The current batteries are heavy obviously, but they are bound to become smaller and lighter and allow for more power.



              vs.

              Something tells me you dont know how hydrogen cars work. And that something is your statement that you dont know hydrogen cars work.

              http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-e...rogen-cars.htm

              They be electric motors sans big ass batteries. Hydrogen is the storage medium. The big catch right now are the cells, they are expensive. Shit changes though, when it does hydrogen is the only solution on the horizon that you can drive 200 miles, stop, fill up in 5 minutes and drive another 200.

              Battery powered cars are decent as city runabouts but useless if you need to go great distances. And good luck with that smaller/lighter. Its happening but it actually slows down with each subsequent generation.
              Im now E30less.
              sigpic

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                #22
                Ryan, you are correct, I made a mistake and forgot about fuel cells. When the word hydrogen came up, all I was thinking about was hydrogen as a fuel for internal combustion engines.

                Hydrogen fuel cells are great! I love the smooth torque you get from electric motors and the very minimal number of parts that can break and I would love to see EITHER HFC or battery technology become cost-effective, reliable, efficient, and useful for long distances.
                Last edited by Sagaris; 08-12-2011, 12:12 PM.

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                  #23
                  I love electric cars. I strongly believe they are going to be and should be the next step.

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                    #24
                    Hydrogen will win, I am counting on it (and betting on it).

                    Fuel cells are pricey but Im only 30 and I remember when only rich people had cell phones.

                    Hydrogen takes a lot of electricity to make but the gas we get for our cars is having to be drilled a mile below the surface, pumped up, shipped or piped across the globe and refined.

                    Hydrogen is hydrogen, it can basically be made at any place where you have a good source of electricity and water. Its convenient because most of our big power plants are near water because they use it to create steam. So at first hydrogen could be coal/nuclear dependent just like batteries but the awesome thing is it could be throwing in with a wind farm, solar or whatever carbon neutral source we get. Then, once its made, its good to go. No shipping to a refinery and compressed it holds a lot more energy that fossil fuels so we would use less of it transporting it to POS.

                    It can be put in underground tanks (already is) and is moved by hoses. It means that hydrogen will make the automotive experience largely the same as it is today, which is key to adoption.
                    Im now E30less.
                    sigpic

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                      #25
                      Problem with electric is the infrastructure isn't ready to support it in the least and the technology really isn't up to par yet. I will buy electric when it becomes more usable and my 1/4 or 1/3 more expensive purchase price is justifiable.

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                        #26
                        My understanding of it is that it has a very low power density, or in other words it requires a very large tank to produce comparable driving range in comparison with a gasoline vehicle. Have you heard anything of the sort?

                        I'd also be down with a car running a Stark Industries Arc Reactor.

                        It is nice to know that electricity is infinitely "renewable". There are so many ways to produce it.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by cale View Post
                          Problem with electric is the infrastructure isn't ready to support it in the least and the technology really isn't up to par yet. I will buy electric when it becomes more usable and my 1/4 or 1/3 more expensive purchase price is justifiable.
                          There are big companys such as Nissan, GM, Ford, Tesla, Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi, Mercedes, and BMW all with electric cars. With all these manufacturers competing to go green we are bound to see huge improvements in weight, range, recharge time, and price within the next couple years. I am thinking this kind of tough competition will make the speed of EV progress unreal.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Vince30 View Post
                            There are big companys such as Nissan, GM, Ford, Tesla, Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi, Mercedes, and BMW all with electric cars. With all these manufacturers competing to go green we are bound to see huge improvements in weight, range, recharge time, and price within the next couple years. I am thinking this kind of tough competition will make the speed of EV progress unreal.

                            Competition among the manufacturers will be good for the price of electric vehicles but it won't solve the infrastructure issues. The electric grid is over taxed in several larger populations centers around the country and just doesn't have the overhead capacity required for a fleet of new electric vehicle drivers. It doesn't matter how many they can make/sell if there's no juice left in the grid to charge them. ;)

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Ryan Stewart View Post
                              Something tells me you dont know how hydrogen cars work. And that something is your statement that you dont know hydrogen cars work.

                              http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-e...rogen-cars.htm

                              They be electric motors sans big ass batteries. Hydrogen is the storage medium. The big catch right now are the cells, they are expensive. Shit changes though, when it does hydrogen is the only solution on the horizon that you can drive 200 miles, stop, fill up in 5 minutes and drive another 200.

                              Battery powered cars are decent as city runabouts but useless if you need to go great distances. And good luck with that smaller/lighter. Its happening but it actually slows down with each subsequent generation.
                              You still haven't explained where you're going to find the hydrogen. Also, how often do you drive 400 miles in a day? Every day... once a week... once a month?

                              This is going to end well.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by Sagaris View Post
                                I do. I wouldn't miss doing timing belt changes, fixing intake, exhaust, and oil leaks, replacing worn sensors or pretty much any sort of repairs you might need.
                                And you own an E30 why?

                                Originally posted by SpasticDwarf
                                Honestly I built it just to have a place to sit and listen to Hotline Bling on repeat.

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