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    Subframe bushing removal

    Wow, this is a lot harder than I thought it'd be...

    I got the center section (the metal piece) and the rubber removed, but the metal outter sleave won't even budge. I cut slots in it with a jig saw, still no go. Heated it up, banged it with a BFH. I spent so much time on it today and got so frustrated, I am almost ready to have a shop press them out. I'd like to hear any tips to removing them though. Is it worth trying to spray PB Blaster on them?

    How much approx. would a shop charge to press them out?


    #2
    get a torch and melt it out ( the rubber part that is )

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      #3
      Get them pressed. If you think thats hard, try getting the new ones in without destroying them. Just get it pressed.
      Adam Fogg- '88 M3

      Common sense- It's the new 'gifted'

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        #4
        I've used the torch method on a friend's E30 subframe bushings. I didn't use some little porta-tank job of a torch....rather a serious torch that can deliver A LOT of heat. I stopped by a local BMW/Porsche shop where the owner let me use this ass-kickin' torch. Talk about heat! I had both bushings removed in about 10 minutes.

        The trick was waving the flame all around the metal flange until the rubber started smoking. Once that happend, one swift hit with a mallet got it out. Keep in mind that you want to push them out fromt the bottom side of the subframe.....the opposite of install. After removal was taken care of, I had one of the shop hands press in the new bushings (he has a slick press for that task). I spent a total of $35 for bushings and install.

        Jon
        Rides...
        1991 325i - sold :(
        2004 2WD Frontier King Cab

        RIP #17 Jules Bianchi

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          #5
          I have urethane bushings, so they will go right in, and I know you have to remove the old bushing downwards, because of that flange on the end.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Digitalwave
            I have urethane bushings, so they will go right in, and I know you have to remove the old bushing downwards, because of that flange on the end.
            I didn't know about the urethane replacements....that will definately make re-install a snap. As for the old bushings, lots of heat is what's needed to get those stubborn buggers out. It'll be a bit smelly and messy.

            Jon
            Rides...
            1991 325i - sold :(
            2004 2WD Frontier King Cab

            RIP #17 Jules Bianchi

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