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  • gwb72tii
    replied
    With apologies to Cale for making his head explode, at least one climate activist is following the science
    https://twitter.com/ShellenbergerMD/...imate-scare%2F


    and here is the entire article
    http://environmentalprogress.org/big...-climate-scare

    we are making progress although a lot on this blog will now dismiss one of their own

    Leave a comment:


  • bradmer
    replied

    Originally posted by decay View Post
    in my time as a devops engineer, i've learned that single points of failure are a bad thing

    redundancy is a good thing

    we need a power grid that utilizes both of those renewable resources, because neither of them is available or reliable everywhere
    6 or 7 years ago we were contracted by PGE to create a micro grid at their Portrero plant (near Candlestick Park, with the tall brick chimney). We installed 20 kW of pv, 3 pallets of salt water medium batteries (lead plates) and connected it through various switchgear so they could select 240/single phase, 208/3phase or 480/3 phase. PGE had some of their brightest minds working on creating micro grids for residential subdivisions, do not know what happened to that project.
    Batteries do suck, don't like working with them. However, there are some coming out that do not act like a runaway train that needs reining in (Tesla resi system), the safer li-io in the Enphase battery system just coming out is 1/3 more cost for 1/3 less power than the Tesla battery puts out, so it has been a hard sell even though it is technologically better and safer, but people are drinking the Tesla Koolaid and appear to be willing to follow that guy off a cliff.

    Leave a comment:


  • decay
    replied
    in my time as a devops engineer, i've learned that single points of failure are a bad thing

    redundancy is a good thing

    we need a power grid that utilizes both of those renewable resources, because neither of them is available or reliable everywhere

    Leave a comment:


  • digger
    replied
    Photovoltaics and batteries the most over rated techs for global energy production

    Leave a comment:


  • bradmer
    replied
    Originally posted by phillipj View Post

    They already are though, because of the economics of it. It's gotten that cheap. The tech does exist, it's advanced so much. Solar used to be a joke as far as being cost effective! It was like 20x the cost of coal in the 90's. Now it is cheaper than coal. And wind is right there too. And it makes up something like 2% of the US energy source (wind a bit more) -- so there's only room for growth. And as adoption increases prices will only go down. Huge businesses and governments, etc., they want to save money -- they won't do this because they care about the environment.

    And imagine if you took out our subsidies for fossil fuels -- $20 Billion + per year -- and you level the playing field, made it a true free market. It'd happen even faster.
    Solar must have an 'annual net energy metering' agreement with the local electrical utility allowing their client to back feed the grid with solar. If that agreement did not exist on an annual basis solar would not be viable on a daily, weekly or monthly schedule even with all of the tax credits (and utility rebates that have long sice dried up). Utility companies are constantly looking for ways to bone their solar rate payers for using the utility infrastructure as a battery. That same infrastructure which has been paid for a long time that now needs upgrading, like being buried underground which is not cheap.

    We have installed 7 li-io Tesla batteries in a residential system combined with 50kW of solar so the client can be tied to the grid if need be, but will produce all of his own energy on site. All it takes is money (@$380k), the tech is here. He can load shift from his smart phone. For reference the house is @ 9000 sq ft with 2 pools.

    In 15 years solar panel output has tripled within the same 18 sq ft foot print, 360 watts from 120. No moving parts so they don't ever seem to break, it's the inverter that converts dc to ac that fails on systems, but even they have gotten much better recently. Also in that time pricing has come down to $3/watt from $8-9/watt for a much better product acheiving close to 21% in efficiency up from 15% with web viewing on every system from your smart phone.

    Hydro is the answer, @ .11 cents/kWh and no toxic after life. #works at night

    Leave a comment:


  • phillipj
    replied
    Originally posted by decay View Post

    is economic impact going to be what it takes for us to acknowledge this? maybe. but that may be too late
    Yes! 100%! Because in that way it becomes most tangible. It's not about believing in (even proven) science anymore, eventually it hits the pocketbook. It's highly about economics. Take our pandemic for example. In some ways it became "real" only then.

    The only exception to this might be firsthand personal experience. In my life, I've seen the reef where I have dove and fished over 40 years get measurably warmer, as well as a healthy amount of pollution coming from us. The coral dies and much of the fish and sealife continues to disappear. It's super sad to witness, and it is not an immediate thing, it's just a gradual death. I can only imagine what it'll look like in another 40 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • decay
    replied
    Originally posted by ForcedFirebird View Post
    ^^^ Yup. Drunk trees are becoming a "thing".
    and beyond that, they are experiencing infrastructure issues because the permafrost their pipelines, tanks, etc, is built on is disappearing and causing failures

    is economic impact going to be what it takes for us to acknowledge this? maybe. but that may be too late
    Last edited by decay; 06-28-2020, 04:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ForcedFirebird
    replied
    ^^^ Yup. Drunk trees are becoming a "thing".

    Leave a comment:


  • decay
    replied
    speaking of violent weather extremes, it's 100 degrees in siberia, north of the arctic circle

    i thought that place was supposed to be a gulag where you froze to death

    https://abcnews.go.com/International...tists-71421935

    Leave a comment:


  • cale
    replied
    Nah, it means the 200 previous years of warming were in fact not attributed to man, and this one article he's stumbled upon is evidence for this.

    Leave a comment:


  • phillipj
    replied
    Originally posted by gwb72tii View Post
    So, what happened to global warming?
    This article took courage to print:

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12534
    That article begins by stating that: "annual-mean Global temperature has not risen in the 21st century" (?)

    However, NOAA and NASA state very clearly that the last decade was the hottest decade ever recorded and the past five years have been the hottest five on record (?)


    Initially, I was confused. Then I looked up "annual mean" : The mean annual temperature refers to the average of the maximum and minimum temperature of a year.

    As our climate changes, we've had very violent weather extremes. It could be very well possible that you could show that the mean (the average of only the very high and the very low) hasn't changed all that much over the last 20 years, whereas the actual average temperature has continually increased.

    Leave a comment:


  • gwb72tii
    replied
    So, what happened to global warming?
    This article took courage to print:

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12534

    Leave a comment:


  • digger
    replied
    Yeah I’m a bit more skeptical about that than you

    Leave a comment:


  • gwb72tii
    replied
    This is a good read and why the future is going to be ok. Tech is not static and we’re not doomed to using fossil fuels forever:

    http://nautil.us/issue/86/energy/the...-fusion-energy

    Leave a comment:


  • phillipj
    replied
    Originally posted by gwb72tii View Post

    Yes the economics of renewables do work in places, but in no way are renewables today able to take the place od fossil fuels, as much as everyone would like that to happen.
    If you want to see this in realtime study the Australian power grid and the havoc renewables cause.

    And I believe you to mean the US tax code (vs subsidies) for the fossil fuel industry. Yes, let's level the playing field and see how may of us want to buy a Tesla, install solar roof top cells, or have a wind farm in your backyard when they remove the tax credit schemes.
    high time
    As I understand it, Tesla's Federal tax credit was completely dropped in 2020; other makes may completely disappear in 2022. Solar too. Certain states will still have incentives, though.

    Fossil Fuel's Billions in subsidies and tax breaks and loopholes will probably never disappear, they have too many politicians bought off. Powerful Corporations & Industries love their Socialism.
    Last edited by phillipj; 06-04-2020, 02:23 PM.

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