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How To Bypass Throttle Body Coolant Housing

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    How To Bypass Throttle Body Coolant Housing

    So my car developed a coolant leak, a small one luckily :). The throttle body housing's warmer unit's gasket had failed... While squeezing one of the radiator hoses I heard air, and some coolant, rushing out of a hole in the gasket. I know it is a popular mod to bypass this heater, so I opted to do that rather than fix it properly. This job took me a whole 5 minutes!

    The leak can be seen here:



    So the part needed, called a "hose splice", can be found at Lowes or another hardware store.The size you need is 3/8". Lowes is within 3 miles of my house so I usually just go there. Locally it was $2.52



    Tools are pretty simple: a 1/4" nutdriver, a small flathead screwdriver, and a pair of hose cutters.



    Here is a closeup of the hose splice



    Step 1: Remove your ICV. Just wiggle the hose off the throttle body, then the other end off the intake boot. This job takes 5 minutes, so just set it on your intake manifold.



    Step 2: Then loosen the top hose clamp with the nutdriver. Screwdrivers work too, but nutdrivers wont fall off the clamp, and will not strip it.



    Step 3: Using the small flathead screwdriver, pry the old hose off (or just yank on it). Coolant may come out, but it is not a big deal.



    Step 4: Do the same with the bottom hose



    You dont want to lose your hose clamps, so take them off and put them aside. I chose the fuse box cover



    At this point, both lines should be off...



    Now is the hard part. Look at the lines and imagine where you could put the splice in. This is hard to photograph, but is very straight forward.

    Step 5: With an idea of where you can put the splice, cut off the excess hose.



    Step 6: Slide on the hose clamps (make sure they both are facing the same way!) and fit the splice. Push each hose fully onto the splice. Tighten the hose clamps!



    You're done!!!

    Here is a final shot of the bypass:


    #2
    Any benefits to this? Other than fixing your leak?
    (SOLD) 1988 327i Build Thread: http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/showthread.php?t=155086
    1970 Gruppe 2 2902 M20 Turbo Build: http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/showthread.php?t=373891

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      #3
      +200 mad tyght rear wheel horsepower from the colder air dawg!

      No, just fixes the leak. Air goesnt get cold enough in most parts of the world to where the heater is actually even needed

      Did this same mod about 2 months ago and I've been leak free since. I found using hand-soap on the hose splice makes it easier for it to slip in if your having trouble getting your hoses over it. It dissolves as well, so you don't need to worry about it messin with your coolant
      Last edited by JinormusJ; 04-16-2012, 03:03 PM.

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        #4
        but now u have those 2 open holes on the TB... wouldnt that cause air to enter the cooling system?
        1989 325i SETA stroker [delphin] R3V'd 8/31/2011
        1989 325ix [zinnoberrot] $OLD
        1970 2002 [Nevada]

        Originally posted by Herr Faust Schinken
        guy must have slid into something that doesn't look like a car vs car hit
        Originally posted by ak-
        Must of slid into Rob

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          #5
          ^No, because they're not connected to anything.

          Originally posted by Janderson
          you can have the keys to my hunk of 20+ year old West German steel when you pry them from my cold dead fingers.

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            #6
            nice write up, i need to do this... the temps here in AZ are killller!!!!
            sigpic

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              #7
              Originally posted by JinormusJ View Post
              +200 mad tyght rear wheel horsepower from the colder air dawg!

              No, just fixes the leak. Air doesnt get cold enough in most parts of the world to where the heater is actually even needed
              I realize you're kidding, but just in case others don't get it...

              The throttle body coolant housing has pretty much zero effect on the temperature of the air coming through the intake system of the engine. Its purpose is to heat the metal of the throttle body housing itself.

              Other than that, the need for a working throttle body heater is more dependent on humidity levels than ambient air temperature. Cold parts of the world actually have less need for the heater, as frigid air carries less humidity.

              Throttle body icing occurs because of the sudden pressure drop from ambient atmospheric pressure down to manifold vacuum as the air flows past the throttle butterfly plate. The effect is most noticeable at long-time part throttle openings, like steady cruising on the highway (not wide open throttle).

              A sudden pressure drop produces a corresponding temperature drop. The drop in temperature reduces the air's ability to hold moisture, so water condenses out as the air passes the throttle plate. If the pressure/temperature drop is sufficient, ice will build up on the cold metal surface of the throttle body and throttle plate.

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                #8
                deleted mine a few weeks ago, the gasket was leaking and then I ripped it trying to fix it so I just barbed them together.

                even with methanol injection which gets my intake manifold VERY cold, like icy cold to touch, their is no freezing or issues.

                [B]ORDER PARTS-
                kamotorsperformance.com

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by rares View Post
                  nice write up, i need to do this... the temps here in AZ are killller!!!!
                  not bad as houston tx

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                    #10
                    Just what I've been looking for! The same leak just happened 2 days ago and I was wondering how I was going to fix it that gasket, looks like I don't need to. Great walk through. Thanks a ton.

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                      #11
                      Followed the write-up today. Super easy. Thanks 5Toes.

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                        #12
                        No problem guys. Glad I could help!

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                          #13
                          Thank you 5Toes! Just what I needed!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Ferdinand View Post
                            I realize you're kidding, but just in case others don't get it...

                            The throttle body coolant housing has pretty much zero effect on the temperature of the air coming through the intake system of the engine. Its purpose is to heat the metal of the throttle body housing itself.

                            Other than that, the need for a working throttle body heater is more dependent on humidity levels than ambient air temperature. Cold parts of the world actually have less need for the heater, as frigid air carries less humidity.

                            Throttle body icing occurs because of the sudden pressure drop from ambient atmospheric pressure down to manifold vacuum as the air flows past the throttle butterfly plate. The effect is most noticeable at long-time part throttle openings, like steady cruising on the highway (not wide open throttle).

                            A sudden pressure drop produces a corresponding temperature drop. The drop in temperature reduces the air's ability to hold moisture, so water condenses out as the air passes the throttle plate. If the pressure/temperature drop is sufficient, ice will build up on the cold metal surface of the throttle body and throttle plate.
                            Well stated.

                            Under some conditions throttle plate icing can be a dangerous problem.
                            B&C Foreign Car - BMW Service Ventura, California. Since 1975

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I welded the fitting on the back of the block closed and JB welded the thermostat housing. It will never leak again for me!!
                              Randall Racing and Engineering
                              Acworth, Georgia, 30101
                              http://www.facebook.com/RandallRacingandEngineering

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