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DIY: Black Plastic Restoration

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  • jhaurimn
    replied
    Originally posted by Stan View Post
    Do you recommend doing this on the front grill?
    It will work great on the front grilles. Take the time to take them off the car, wipe them clean, then apply. Wont last forever, but will last for quite a long time and can always be re-applied. Will make them look like they were freshly painted.

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  • Stan
    replied
    Do you recommend doing this on the front grill?

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  • rzerob
    replied
    If you want this to work even better try running a heat gun over top of it for a little bit before using this treatment. Mine looked brand new when I did it. Be careful with the heat gun, just experiment on the cautious side. Or practice with an old or broken piece you are not using before trying on the parts on your car.

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  • parkerbink
    replied
    Just did my 2010 Tundra. Looks great, thanks!
    Attached Files

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  • Shangsta
    replied
    I did it last night and I agree with the above poster. It took some trim that was so grey i was convinced that it would need to be painted and made it look black again

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  • Powling
    replied
    I did the linseed oil method a couple weeks ago and it was so stupid easy to do, and made so much extra for applying later on that I don't mind reapplying it every few months.

    Heck, its a 25 year old car with 25 year old plastic. I'm not expecting it to be perfectly black unless I am replacing the parts with brand new OEM replacements.

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  • jhaurimn
    replied
    Originally posted by nmlss2006 View Post
    Folks, I hate to just come back and be 'that guy' but linseed oil is what was used in place of modern transparent urethane coatings... before there were urethane coatings.

    Apart from the combustion concerns (which should perhaps be studied a little more carefully: in particular, with a thin layer that has already polymerised... you do not need to worry), which really are non-existent, it is meaningfully outperformed in any application by modern products. To include something like a can of Rustoleum matte clear, among others...

    Well, ofcourse painting is more effective. But painting requires masking, removal of parts, etc.

    There isnt really a permanent solution to trim fading. It happens no matter what product you use. (even your spray can clear coat will fade eventually) This combination however is extremely cheap, very fast to apply, and will last at the very least a few months. Which is comparable to most, much more expensive products.

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  • nmlss2006
    replied
    Folks, I hate to just come back and be 'that guy' but linseed oil is what was used in place of modern transparent urethane coatings... before there were urethane coatings.

    Apart from the combustion concerns (which should perhaps be studied a little more carefully: in particular, with a thin layer that has already polymerised... you do not need to worry), which really are non-existent, it is meaningfully outperformed in any application by modern products. To include something like a can of Rustoleum matte clear, among others...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mahalaleel
    replied
    So it's been a while now. I think the shiny washed off in the car wash, so they're back to chalky.

    I may try plasti-dipping the door moldings and the trim around the windows and belt moldings, to see if I really want it all black.

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  • Hynrgee
    replied
    Worked for Me

    I tried the 50/50 mix following jhaurimn's instructions and then used Luke's approach to getting cosmoline off the valve cover and intake manifold. What a difference! If I could post photos I would share a pretty dramatic before and after. I've cleaned the engine bay before but it has never looked this good. These are simple and inexpensive approaches to maintaining the car. Thanks for sharing.

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  • Mfever
    replied
    Technically there is no permanent fix. These plastics do require some maintenance. Since I purchased all new trim when my car got repaints, I've been maintaining it with either Aerospace 303 or wolf's trim coat. Awesome products for moisturizing and replenishing some of the oils that the UV rays take away.

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  • bimmerR75
    replied
    Originally posted by DRVN2WN View Post
    Looks like an interesting option to clean them up. I was going to offer that 303 works great on the exterior trim pieces.

    I haven't tried this, but would recommend that anyone that cleans their plastics up using the method in this thread then follows that up with application of 303 Aerospace protectant. It will actually help prevent the discoloration and UV damage that you start to see.

    My plastics weren't as bad as some in here, but I found that a good cleaning of mine with a mild detergent (dish soap, or whatever you choose, could be just about anything) and then application of the 303 with a periodic touch up does just fine. For more severely discolored plastics, the write up in this thread may be necessary.
    Just picked up a set of Euro Grilles, going to do the 50/50 method then after thats wiped clean, going to spray with the 303, hopefully that will keep it looking nice and new.

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  • DRVN2WN
    replied
    Looks like an interesting option to clean them up. I was going to offer that 303 works great on the exterior trim pieces.

    I haven't tried this, but would recommend that anyone that cleans their plastics up using the method in this thread then follows that up with application of 303 Aerospace protectant. It will actually help prevent the discoloration and UV damage that you start to see.

    My plastics weren't as bad as some in here, but I found that a good cleaning of mine with a mild detergent (dish soap, or whatever you choose, could be just about anything) and then application of the 303 with a periodic touch up does just fine. For more severely discolored plastics, the write up in this thread may be necessary.

    Leave a comment:


  • EtaDriven
    replied
    Well after a few months (as expected) the nice "new" finish has faded off considerably.. TBH it still looks a little better than it did in places, and I didn't really expect a permanent fix or anything so I'm still pretty happy.
    How she currently sits:




    That 303 looks incredible on the interior stuff. I may have to try that sometime too.. ;D

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  • c0rbin9
    replied
    +1 on the 303 for interior plastics. I've recently done some research on the best stuff to use and it comes highly recommended.

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