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Dad's Datsun 510

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  • the_eskimo_wonder
    replied
    Every detail of this car is just incredible. I love the interior work and all the textured black. It looks fantastic.

    I'm jealous of the father son project as well. My dad has moved away from car projects as I've gotten more passionate about them. A project like this together would be amazing.

    Leave a comment:


  • hochiminh
    replied
    Dang, just found this thread. Was hoping to suggest vantablack for the dash ala Gesaffelstein.

    Also did you shoot some of those opening pics on 135? Color rendering reminds me of it Kodak Gold.

    Leave a comment:


  • Balleristic31
    replied
    Once the wiring was all set, we could finally do a finished assembly on the dash panel. Before that could take place, the dash and rear seat delete panels need to be coated with the previously chosen wrinkle black finish. Initially we were going to use VHT spray and work the wrinkles in manually with a heat gun, but after a bit of deliberation we determined powder coating would be a much better and more durable option. The end result was very satisfying and looks fantastic!

    First the rear panels were mocked up in their final position. Looking good!







    Then came the upper dash panel.



    And finally, the front face of the dash. Fantastic!








    Installed!







    And here are a few pictures of the backside of the dash panel all tidied up.





    All in all, we are thrilled with how the dash came together. It’s starting to look like a car again!

    Leave a comment:


  • 2mAn
    replied
    Looking good, Ive considered getting a painless wiring harness for mine

    Leave a comment:


  • jeenyus
    replied
    wiring is no joke! There are twice as many wires as an elevator with many floors. it's great work youre doing here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Balleristic31
    replied
    Originally posted by jeenyus View Post
    I have a question regarding the aluminum covers your dad made in the fender well. So they were tacked in and you used seam sealer to make sure no water would get in. I'm curious what the limitations of seam sealer is. I have a project that I'm doing where I'm patching metal pieces and once in a while I will get a pin hole that is hard to fill. That being said, I have not worried too much about it because I figured that the epoxy primer and seam sealer would be more than enough to keep it together and avoid rust. I'm curious of you can drop some knowledge regarding the seam sealer itself and what it's limitations are? I've see auto manufactures use it to basically hold a panel onto the car with a few spot welds, similar to what your dad did with the aluminum piece. Really I'm just trying to find assurance that I will be fine doing it the way I'm doing it.

    Thanks! Love the build!
    Thank you! You should be able to use seam sealer for what you are describing. I wouldn't worry about any issues with water as many panels are water tight with seam sealer on tons of cars.


    Time for an update!
    Dad has been working extremely hard to finish up the wiring and we are beginning to inch closer and closer to that first drive! This part of the project was extremely daunting, but with patience and the well labeled/designed Painless wiring kit, the overall process was…. relatively painless. We wanted the dash panel to be 100% removable and serviceable so the wiring harness attached to all the gauges and switches had to be on a separate loom.


    Below was a relatively early mock-up of some of the wiring.


    Once the location of the fuse box and relays were roughly determined, the dash harness was slowly put together.







    And ended up looking like this!




    Looking great! All connections were crimped/soldered and shrink wrapped.
    A couple power and ground distribution blocks were then mounted to the dash support.


    Once the dash harness was created the body harness was formed. Dad made a connector to separate the dash harness from the main harness and fuse box for serviceability.


    You can see where that harness spits out of the firewall here next to the fusebox.


    And then the remainder of the inside body harness.








    [url=https://flic.kr/p/2hGcdQ1]

    And here you can see the engine bay harness where it comes through the firewall. A power junction block included in the Painless kit was mounted to the passenger side firewall.




    Here you can see all of the starter wiring.


    The front lights, ignition, and alternator wiring come out of the inner fender well and into the engine bay on the passenger side.









    Looking awesome! This was a ton of work and I really think the wiring came out fantastic and exceeded expectations. Many hours went into this harness and it really shows.
    Last edited by Balleristic31; 11-07-2019, 05:06 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeenyus
    replied
    I have a question regarding the aluminum covers your dad made in the fender well. So they were tacked in and you used seam sealer to make sure no water would get in. I'm curious what the limitations of seam sealer is. I have a project that I'm doing where I'm patching metal pieces and once in a while I will get a pin hole that is hard to fill. That being said, I have not worried too much about it because I figured that the epoxy primer and seam sealer would be more than enough to keep it together and avoid rust. I'm curious of you can drop some knowledge regarding the seam sealer itself and what it's limitations are? I've see auto manufactures use it to basically hold a panel onto the car with a few spot welds, similar to what your dad did with the aluminum piece. Really I'm just trying to find assurance that I will be fine doing it the way I'm doing it.

    Thanks! Love the build!

    Leave a comment:


  • IRON-E
    replied
    Nice. Now to wait for the next update.

    Leave a comment:


  • Balleristic31
    replied
    Tackling the exhaust was high on the priority list while the car was up in the air on jack stands. The exhaust that came on the car was basically junk so we scrapped everything rearward of the header collector.

    After cutting/shaping/ fitting repeatedly, we ended up with this: Front and mid section joined together by V-bands.

    48862572157_1af5cf4cc8_c.jpg



    48861848393_871b556d9d_c.jpg



    Muffler selected was a Borla Pro XS. Below you can see the rear section all welded up with hangers included.



    48729441522_76742e7072_c.jpg



    Here is how the subframe area looks all mocked up. Pretty clean!

    48728935388_2ecc960a2a_c.jpg



    A small section was removed to get the bend a bit tighter to the body after we fit everything up.



    48729438617_23af6ec2e7_c.jpg



    And final fitment with a stainless tip cut at approximately a 10-15 degree slant-cut. Looks awesome and is rock solid!



    48729267871_d5ec4f38ab_c.jpg



    48729442147_e464c0bcbf_c.jpg



    Once that was all buttoned up, the car got rolled into the sun on all fours for the first time since the build began! Looks fantastic in the sun!



    48729317506_0e60b9bec2_c.jpg



    48729315381_67d343e461_c.jpg



    The maestro himself!

    48729319501_de6d0a5130_c.jpg



    48729496222_3066fa5b4e_c.jpg



    Wiring is next!

    Leave a comment:


  • Balleristic31
    replied
    Since we got the car the brake pedal never had any pressure, so now that the suspension was sorted it was time to address the braking system.

    Ideas for front hardlines were kicked around, but at the end of the day we determined stainless steel softlines would do the job just find and be much more workable. All front lines were custom/hand made out of DOT approved braided lines/fittings and diligently checked over after a good bleed. The results speak for themselves! Below is an example of the fittings/lines used throughout.





    And all buttoned up!





    Close up!





    Clutch master cylinder mounted and its line/bulkhead fitting made.





    Then the brake master and lines!















    Here you can see the fitting that goes out to the driver’s side front wheel.





    And here is what inside the cabin looks like with all the bulkhead fittings and lines. Some aluminum dividers were whipped up to clean things up a bit!









    After all that, rear softlines were made in a similar manner and everything got bled and checked for leaks. The system was air tight and we finally had a brake pedal!



    Here’s a nice shot showing all the bling under the car including the front brake line installed.




    Leave a comment:


  • rturbo 930
    replied
    That's an R200, he more likely has an R160 or R180 diff. Subaru diff swap or OS Giken LSD is likely the way to go for the 510. I'm not a 510 guy, but I don't get the impression that R200s are popular for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrAdam
    replied
    that is nice.... my dad had 3 at different times when I was a kid - part of the reason I went dual webers on my 2002. great build so far.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2mAn
    replied
    Originally posted by Balleristic31 View Post

    Differential is unfortunately open with 4:10 ratio. That will be addressed at some point…
    https://ratsun.net/classifieds/item/...d-clutch-type/

    I think this is the style you need

    Originally posted by IRON-E View Post
    I really enjoy coming in here for all the updates. I'm glad you get to share this build with your Dad. Tell him I said hello and can't wait to do a shakedown drive in Algeles Crest when the car is ready.
    There could be TWO Datsuns at this R3V drive

    Leave a comment:


  • IRON-E
    replied
    I really enjoy coming in here for all the updates. I'm glad you get to share this build with your Dad. Tell him I said hello and can't wait to do a shakedown drive in Algeles Crest when the car is ready.

    Leave a comment:


  • Balleristic31
    replied
    Originally posted by 2mAn View Post
    Loving how this is coming along, is the metal dash and rear seat delete staying bare or is there a surprises in the works for that stuff too?
    At this point we are thinking wrinkle black finish for the dash and the rear seat delete. Subject to change, but that will more than likely be the final finish.

    Rear-end time. 510s are very similar to E30s in that the rear suspension is a semi-trailing arm with inboard spring. The plan for this car is to convert to true rear coilovers which is much safer to do on 510s than E30s without reinforcement (according to my Dad at least, I told him we should box in the towers but he seems convinced).
    First Dad dropped own the crusty old rear end. We have a running theory that the car was semi-submerged at some point, as evidenced by the insane level of crud all over everything.










    All blown apart and semi cleaned up. No serious rust or damage on the trailing arms and subframe!







    Differential is unfortunately open with 4:10 ratio. That will be addressed at some point…


    Subframe getting prepped for weld-in camber and toe adjusters. Super substantial heavy-duty pieces!
















    Got everything all welded in!








    Trailing arms got cleaned up and painted. Then sleeves for the spherical trailing arm bushings were pressed in and tacked into place. Original Datsun hardware was retained when possible. All bolts were media blasted and coated with high strength clear coat for a pretty cool looking finish.









    As with the front wheel wells, the entire rear end of the car was stripped of its undercoating, inspected, and repainted in body color. Dad also made up a thin sheet aluminum cover to fill the gap between the sliced up fenders and the flares (all the horrific cavity foam was left over PO body work… real high quality stuff…). Results were very satisfying to say the least!












    And some finished shots! Aluminum panels were riveted in place and sealed up with some seam sealer before paint.






    Hmmmm whats this?


    Time for the rear end to go back in. Poly bushings for the subframe and differential mounts.


    And the money shots….







    Rear Wilwood disc conversion!




    And finally, a little teaser of the rear wheel fitment. You can really see the quality of the paint in body work in these shots as well!




    Leave a comment:

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