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Using braided stainless steel fuel hose?

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    Using braided stainless steel fuel hose?

    Looking for opinions here...

    One thing to keep in mind for this question is that cost is not a concern (hypothetically).

    Has anyone used braided stainless steel PTFE fuel hose on a daily driver on the underside of the car for fuel delivery/return?
    I want to go this route, but I want to know what are the benefits, challenges, etc?

    I've heard that the hose can rub on the body and can rub off any underbody coating...true/false? (I don't know why this happen if there are properly spaces hose clamps)

    Thanks!
    Last edited by bimmerboy8912; 12-26-2019, 07:12 PM.
    The BMW Bible: http://www.realoem.com

    2011 328i xDrive Sedan - DD
    2002 530i - sold
    1994 525i - gave to dad
    1991 345is (M102 Swap) - sold
    1985 325e - sold

    #2
    my 30 year old hard lines on my daily are fine. why mess with them? sent from hell using tapatalk
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    '90 325i sedan daily driven
    '85 325e coupe also a daily

    Comment


      #3
      Thumb down from me.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by cheffy30 View Post
        my 30 year old hard lines on my daily are fine. why mess with them? sent from hell using tapatalk
        Put in a new high flow fuel pump and upgrading the whole fuel system. The new hose/lines will have to route a different way (part of the way) because of the new pump location.
        The BMW Bible: http://www.realoem.com

        2011 328i xDrive Sedan - DD
        2002 530i - sold
        1994 525i - gave to dad
        1991 345is (M102 Swap) - sold
        1985 325e - sold

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by dnguyen1963 View Post
          Thumb down from me.
          Why's that?
          The BMW Bible: http://www.realoem.com

          2011 328i xDrive Sedan - DD
          2002 530i - sold
          1994 525i - gave to dad
          1991 345is (M102 Swap) - sold
          1985 325e - sold

          Comment


            #6
            if your upgrading your fuel system then you might as well go with the braided if that's what your interested in, it looks cool. the braided should be easier to install than hard line if your starting from scratch. bending the hard lines neatly would be the challenge i think. although I think the bigger diameter of the braided would present a disadvantage to hard steel line.

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              #7
              Good cunifer fuel lines are easy to bend & look less boy racer than a 6 foot length of steel braided line. You can flair the ends to take an fittings & just run short lengths of braided line. How much did your fuel pump outlet move with the upgraded parts?

              Comment


                #8
                You can also go to most hose shops and get stainless tubing.

                I would keep with tubing over hose.
                Zach@Zakspeed.us

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by bimmerboy8912 View Post

                  Why's that?
                  For a daily driver, there is no real benefit except for the look.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Wider diameter braided hoses will not fit in the plastic clips that hold the OE hard lines. Those clips also hold the hard brake line. You will have to redesign the mounting if you go with braided. OE supply and return lines are still available. Just replaced mine.

                    Cory
                    1992 325i 'vert
                    1988 320i Touring
                    2000 M5
                    1977 530i
                    2015 328i - Euro Delivery/Performance Center Delivery
                    BMWCCA
                    E30CCA

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I ran braided line on another car I revamped the fuel system on about 15 years ago. It's still holding up fine feeding a turbo LSx. However, I did it because I was young and uncomfortable bending/flaring hardline. If I were to do it again I'd run hardline and flare fittings. Easier to fix later on if there are issues and looks better to me.
                      1984 325e m50nv/G260
                      1991 325i Mortdecai the pickup project
                      1991 Trans Am turboLSx/t56
                      1984 Husqvarna Abomination

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Nah, me neither.
                        Use flexible tubing where it needs to be,
                        rigid where it doesn't. Even on racey cars, the
                        sanctioning bodies prefer a hardline.
                        One reason being, it's far easier to see if it's damaged.

                        You can crush PTFE tubing, and the braided shield will re- form,
                        but the tubing inside may still be compromised.

                        But it's your car- you certainly won't kill anyone if you do it reasonably well!

                        t
                        doesn't think it matters.
                        now, sometimes I just mess with people. It's more entertaining that way. george graves

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I see a lot of shows where they use "rubber" fuel like the length of the car, it's less labor. I would do that on something i want to get running now. But in the long run, I would use a hard line. Nickle copper is easy to bend and cheap.

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