Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1984 318i Resurrection

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #61
    I initially thought I would purchase the factory BMW lines. Total cost was going to be $300-400 for the hard brake and fuel lines. But I became concerned that I might not be able to make some of the tight radius bends in the steel line that runs to the rear junction under the fuel tank without kinking it. So after doing some online research I decided to make my own copper-nickel lines. To do this I needed a flaring tool for European bubble flares. While there are many inexpensive tools on the market that could probably get the job done I wanted something a step above. The gold standard is the Mastercool hydraulic flare tool, but at $325-400 its an expensive tool if you are only doing one job. I lucked out when I saw a Snap On Blue Point hydraulic flare tool on Ebay for $89. This is essentially a rebranded Mastercool product. It didn’t have the bubble flare die set, but I found a set for $59. This tool works flawlessly. And it is a good investment as someday I’ll be doing a front disc brake conversion on our 57 Corvette. With this tool and a cheap $12 HF tube bender I was ready to attack this project.

    Twenty-five feet of Copper nickel 3/16 tubing with ten M10 fitting is about $35. This is enough with a few extra fittings to just about do the entire system (I didn’t replace the line from the master to the right front brake since it was in good shape). The tubing comes in a roll and you can try to straighten it by hand, but it’s best to have tubing straightener. I didn’t have access to one and wasn’t going to spend $100 for one. I found a number of homemade designs online. My homemade tubing straightener used 3/4 x 1 1/4” aluminum bars (two 12” bars for $11 on Ebay), 5 screen door rollers (about $8 on Amazon) and some 1/4 bolts which I had in my work shop. To straighten the 5/16” tubing I replaced the screen door rollers with some small pulleys and now I have a straightener for 5/16 tubing. Using the screen door rollers left scratches on the surface of the 5/16” tubing.



    Comment


      #62
      I first created the tubing sections using the lengths listed with the part numbers found on the various online BMW parts sites. Here is a 560 mm brake line and the 3120 mm main brake line. Some of the bends were made with the tubing bender while smaller radius bend were made by bending the tubing around an appropriately size socket.



      Comment


        #63
        I went with a new brass junction block up under the rear end and all new soft brake lines. New wheel cylinders, brake shoe and drums completed the rear set up.

        Comment


          #64
          5/16 copper nickel is a near match of the factory BMW steel fuel lines. A little harder to bend that the 3/16 tubing and so the tubing bender came in handy. Go slow or it can kink. The only challenging line is the one from the charcoal filter to the evaporative expansion tank. To get the little flare on the end of the line to help prevent the soft line coming off can be done with the flare tool. Using the bubble flare die you just start to make the flare and you get enough of a flare to keep a high pressure soft line in place. I used Oetiker single ear clamps on the non-high pressure lines because that’s what BMW used and because I think they look neat. I haven’t installed the front brakes yet since I’m in the middle redoing the front struts with Koni Sport shocks and H&R springs and waiting on one part.

          Comment


            #65
            awesome job dude
            We're out there in here.

            Comment

            Working...
            X