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My Forever Car: '89 325i Touring

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    #76
    nice! you've been busy.

    Originally posted by -J- View Post
    I opted for grey because it makes cracks a bit easier to spot, and we all know how much BMWs love to crack subframes.
    e30s actually aren't known for this..
    cars beep boop

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      #77
      BTW, recommend to use a diff stud kit. it makes reinstallation a lot less annoying.
      cars beep boop

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        #78
        Originally posted by kronus View Post
        e30s actually aren't known for this..
        I know that rear subframe cracking is more of an E46 thing, but E30s crack their fronts, right? I was more or less ripping on BMW in general, haha. I also want to keep a close on my welded spots in case they decide to go.

        I really considered the diff stud kit, but got hung up on the stock vs. subframe riser debate. I may go risers but wanted to check clearances for the DTM alignment kit first. For the time being I'll lower the subframe for diff removal, but once I decide I'm going with studs for sure.
        -----I drink and I know car things-----
        1989 325i Touring - Daily W.I.P.
        ->https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=398457

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          #79
          nice work upgrading all the hardware and tearing into the rear end.

          one trick for the diff studs is to just use longer bolts for the front mounting hole. and run the bolts from the bottom. this at least helps get 2 out of the 4 mounting bolts lined up.


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            #80
            Originally posted by -J- View Post
            I know that rear subframe cracking is more of an E46 thing, but E30s crack their fronts, right?
            e30s break the motor mount ears off the front subframe, and can break/mangle both front and rear sway bar mount tabs with uprated sways, but that's about it in terms of cracking.
            cars beep boop

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              #81
              Bummer about the rust, but I'm sure you'll handle it with ease.

              Excellent work!
              My previous build (currently E30-less)
              http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/showthread.php?t=170390

              A 2016 Toyota Tacoma TRD 4x4 Offroad in Inferno is my newest obsession

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                #82
                Originally posted by iwantspeed
                nice work upgrading all the hardware and tearing into the rear end.

                one trick for the diff studs is to just use longer bolts for the front mounting hole. and run the bolts from the bottom. this at least helps get 2 out of the 4 mounting bolts lined up.
                Thanks! I'll keep this in mind if I need to drop the diff again.

                Originally posted by kronus
                e30s break the motor mount ears off the front subframe, and can break/mangle both front and rear sway bar mount tabs with uprated sways, but that's about it in terms of cracking.
                Good to know. I plan on reinforcing the front when it's out for the swap.

                Originally posted by MR E30 325i
                Bummer about the rust, but I'm sure you'll handle it with ease.

                Excellent work!
                Thanks! Beer and swearing usually helps ease the pain of rust removal, haha.


                As a small update, I've spend the last few nights bending the stainless hard lines. They shouldn't rust which is why I chose them, but one thing I didn't anticipate: stainless lines are much stiffer than standard steel lines and don't appreciate being bent. My finger tips are currently numb from manhandling the lines into shape...


                Stainless lines hurt to bend by hand, but damn is it worth it


                The main line going to the rear. This line SUCKED to make, but I'm pretty happy with how it turned out

                Upon removing the rear main line I also discovered that it had been repaired at some point. It was cut just ahead of the fuel filter and was replaced with copper tubing. It wasn't leaking, but I'm still slapping myself for taking this car on track without doing a full brake system inspection. Thankfully the brakes shouldn't be an issue with this car for a very long time after this.
                -----I drink and I know car things-----
                1989 325i Touring - Daily W.I.P.
                ->https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=398457

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                  #83
                  Long time no update, mostly on account of a three week work trip to Germany. It's wasn't all work though; I did get to drive the 'Ring for the first time. I now get why people travel the world to drive there... There really is no other track in the world quite like it.

                  Anyway, back to the Touring. With the rear components finally cleaned up I could move on with the rear suspension assembly.






                  Fun fact: a Miata 3-4 transmission synchro hub is just barely bigger than an E30 bearing, and with a slight grind works perfectly as a bearing press. You know, for all of you out there that dick with Miata transmissions but also dick with E30 rear suspensions




                  This is what needs to be removed in order to fit the E46 325i rotor. It hurts cut into fresh OEM parts like this, but it must be done


                  The mounted dust shield with caliper. Future me really wants to fill the gap between the shield and the top of the caliper, but for now I just want to drive the damn car


                  Hub, studs, and parking brake installed


                  That's a lot of rotor. And yes, the slots are opposite of what StopTech recommends. However, the PFC front rotors have directional cooling vanes and must be mounted with the slots angling backwards, and it'd look weird having opposite-facing slots. The StopTech rotors have straight vanes and the instructions that came with them say they can be mounted either way without affecting performance


                  The Elcoy/Nasieg kit calls for E30 front soft lines but since I chose to mount them in the lower position for the miniscule CG height advantage it required a different hose solution. The E46 M3 rear lines did the trick. I plan on making a damper-mounted bracket to support the line


                  Gratuitous old-and-busted-vs-new-hotness shot...


                  And the finished product. There are multiple hundreds of hours in this shot alone. I left the eccentrics in the stock E30 position until I can get the DTM alignment kit installed

                  With the rear sub-assembly finally complete the next steps will be installing the Bimmerworld anti-roll bars and fitting the sub-assembly. That's tonight's task. It's starting to feel like I might actually drive this car again!

                  Also: for the weight-weenies of the world I grabbed some old vs. new component data.


                  Kosei K1 15x7 with Toyo RA1 205/55R15 vs. Apex ARC-8 17x9 with Continental ExtremeContact Sport 255/40R17. 8lb difference


                  Kosei K1 15x7 with Toyo RA1 205/55R15 vs. Apex ARC-8 17x10 with Continental ExtremeContact Sport 275/40R17. 11lb difference


                  E30 front caliper and bolts, pads, and rotor


                  E46 M3 competition package caliper and mounting bolts, Elcoy adapter bracket and mounting bolts, PFC V3 rotor for E46 M3 competition package, PFC Z-Rated street pads, 25mm wheel spacer, extra lug stud and nut (from going 4->5 lug). 12lb difference


                  E30 rear caliper and mounting bolts, pads, and rotor


                  E39 540i rear caliper and mounting bolts, Elcoy adapter bracket and mounting bolts, StopTech slotted rotor for E46 325i, PFC Z-Rated Street pads, extra lug stud and nut (from going 4->5 lug). 4lb difference

                  So, here's the breakdown:

                  Front brakes +24lbs
                  Front wheels and tires +16lbs
                  Rear brakes +8lbs
                  Rear wheels and tires +22lbs

                  Front unsprung mass +40lbs
                  Rear unsprung +30lbs

                  Total mass increase of 70lbs.

                  Grip and thermal capacity come with a price, and unfortunately that price is weight. I don't anticipate any brake or tire overheating issues though, so there's that.
                  -----I drink and I know car things-----
                  1989 325i Touring - Daily W.I.P.
                  ->https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=398457

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                    #84
                    Rear suspension is finally in.


                    My OCD is quite pleased

                    The install went smoothly, with the exception of the BimmerWorld rear ARB. This design must not have been tested on a Touring because this is what I found when I drilled the floor:


                    This little guy holds down a carpet piece that transitions the trunk to the rear seats

                    I got lucky and didn't hit the studs on either side. I ended up drilling the bracket so that the stud could pass through. The interior piece will need a light trimming as well.

                    The next issue was the bar bracket itself. It mounted snuggly when mocked up but I couldn't for the life of me get it to fit with the actual bar in place. Turns out that the tab that the OEM bracket uses for locating itself wasn't allowing the threads to line up. The new studs will provide more stiffness than that tab could ever hope to, so out came the hammer...


                    A few enthusiastic swings later, boom the bracket fits perfectly

                    With the rear in place I could finally test fit the 275 rears and see what I needed for spacing and cutting.


                    Tight, but doable


                    Yeah, the Kamotors flares are going to find their limit...

                    With the rear buttoned up I can move on to the MRT roll center kit in the front, then get to cutting. I'm realistically hoping I can drive this thing this weekend.
                    -----I drink and I know car things-----
                    1989 325i Touring - Daily W.I.P.
                    ->https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=398457

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                      #85
                      This is going to be quite badass when its all done
                      Simon
                      Current Cars:
                      -1986 BMW 325e & 1968 Datsun Roadster 2000
                      Previous Car Count : 21 ... and climbing...
                      Originally posted by Melon
                      Let it be known to all. Simon fucking keeps it real.

                      Comment


                        #86
                        This is going to be quite badass when its all done
                        That's what I keep telling myself in order to stay motivated, haha.

                        It's been a long few weeks but progress has been made. I picked up some rod end dust boots for the anti-roll bar links by way of Seals-It.


                        I don't know why boots aren't included with every aftermarket adjustable link kit (OK I do: cost) but these should keep the BimmerWorld links clean and squeak-free for a long while.


                        I refurb'd the mounting bracket and used the supplied hardware. The links are a bit of a pain to install with the boots on, but worth it for the lubrication and corrosion protection.


                        I have yet to find a single good bushing on this car...


                        The only hiccup on the front bar install was the bushing. The bracket was so corroded on the rubber side that I couldn't get the poly bar bushing to fit. I reused the old bushing and bracket and will order OEM ones.


                        While the front bar was being installed I took the opportunity to install the MRT roll center correction kit. I must have been in get-shit-done mode because I have a distinct lack of pictures, but I did get these:


                        The outer ball joint needs to be replaced with the MRT supplied spherical. The old one put up a fight but the 20-ton press eventually won. It made a hell of a bang though.


                        Fully installed. The kit is well made and install was straightforward minus the ball joint removal. The control arm to rotor clearance is TIGHT though, and will likely need some grinding to be happy. ​​​​​​​


                        I also finished the last of the brake lines. The fronts were actually in decent shape except for the bit that pokes into the wheel well. I had the hard line, so screw it.



                        And now onto the hardcore stuff: fitting the KaMotors flares.


                        Step one: mock up and mark up


                        Step two: measure x100, and...


                        ​​​​​​​Cut once


                        Step three: fit the flare ​​​​​​​


                        Step four: swear are yourself for being overambitious with tire sizing


                        This is with 90deg of steering at the wheel and some moderate "massaging" of the valence. ​​​​​​​Not even close to fitting. Valence hacking or smaller wheels and tires are the only options here.


                        ​​​​​​The steps for the rear are much the same





                        Inner fender skin trimmed


                        Inner fender bent up to meet o​​​​​​​uter


                        Most opt to weld at this point, but I figured I'd try something different. 3M panel bond is used in panel replacement in modern repairs as an alternative to welding, and should bond as strong as weld (except in peel, but the stresses on these panels definitely aren't peel). As usual with any glue application, prep is key.


                        It takes roughly four hours to ​​​​​​​set up but I kept the clamps on overnight. It seems plenty strong, but I'll still be keeping an eye on it. Worst case I grind it off and resort to welding.

                        IMG_20190813_194905
                        For anyone cringing at cutting on a Touring: this is what I found under the left rear. It would have had to be cut regardless.


                        With the cutting done, I mounted the Arc-8's and got it on the ground for the first time in over two months. I was super excited to see it back on the ground, but a few minutes of fiddling will the steering wheel all but confirmed that these tires straight up wouldn't fit without significant hacking.

                        I was left with two options: be my stubborn self and keep cutting until they fit, or, get smaller wheels and tires. Ultimately I plan on an M3 body conversion which should be able to house the 255's. That, combined with my desire to just drive the damn thing lead me to picking up a different wheel and tire setup.


                        Sorry, Arc-8's you'll have to wait for some serious body work


                        In the meantime: TRMotorsport ​​​​​​​C4's in 17x8 et32 and 17x9 et45 (E90 fitment) wrapped in Michelin PS4S' in 225/45R17 and 245/40R17. 12mm spacer up front and 25mm spacer in the rear.


                        I'm not completely sold on the wheels after seeing them on the car but they'll get me on the road. I use TRMotorsports wheels on my Spec Miata and have no issues with bending (and I abuse curbs; if it's not grass or dirt, it's a racing surface, haha), so these should survive Michigan roads no problem.

                        As for the tires, I have a ton of miles on PS4S' from driving them on vehicles at work, and good God damn do they stick. It is straight up black magic how they're able to get that much grip in so many conditions, including snow. These are the tires I originally wanted, but they don't offer them in 275 and 17in so I opted for Conti's. I'm excited to see what these tires can do on an E30.

                        Next steps are shakedown runs to fully bleed the brakes, bedding brakes, verifying everything clears, and diff break-in.

                        ​​​​​​​Oh, and painting the flares. Definitely painting the flares.
                        Last edited by -J-; 08-26-2019, 09:20 AM.
                        -----I drink and I know car things-----
                        1989 325i Touring - Daily W.I.P.
                        ->https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=398457

                        Comment


                          #87
                          Originally posted by -j- View Post

                          i abuse curbs; if it's not grass or dirt, it's a racing surface, haha
                          :rofl:
                          Simon
                          Current Cars:
                          -1986 BMW 325e & 1968 Datsun Roadster 2000
                          Previous Car Count : 21 ... and climbing...
                          Originally posted by Melon
                          Let it be known to all. Simon fucking keeps it real.

                          Comment


                            #88
                            Any thoughts of running kamotors ultrawides instead to get the extra clearance? seems like the easiest route
                            Originally posted by priapism
                            My girl don't know shit, but she bakes a mean cupcake.
                            Originally posted by shameson
                            Usually it's best not to know how much money you have into your e30

                            Comment


                              #89
                              Originally posted by Northern View Post
                              Any thoughts of running kamotors ultrawides instead to get the extra clearance? seems like the easiest route
                              That was my first thought, but then I realized that it wouldn't fix the valence clearance issue. The 255's could definitely fit if the valence is pulled/trimmed, but this project has been draining the life out of me for the past three months and I just want to get back on the road before the summer is over. That and I plan on the box flare conversion in the future and that'd be a perfect time to cut/trim/pull until it's just right.
                              -----I drink and I know car things-----
                              1989 325i Touring - Daily W.I.P.
                              ->https://www.r3vlimited.com/board/sho...d.php?t=398457

                              Comment


                                #90
                                I would say cut the valence behind the bumper where you can't tell, but I think you'll hit the front of the wheelwell shortly after. I didn't interfere with the valence, but did hit the wheelwell... Maybe centered CABs could be an option?
                                Originally posted by priapism
                                My girl don't know shit, but she bakes a mean cupcake.
                                Originally posted by shameson
                                Usually it's best not to know how much money you have into your e30

                                Comment

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