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Removing that darned water pump

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    Removing that darned water pump

    As many others have experienced, my water pump was quite seized in the block. I spent hours attempting to loosen it using the various methods I've seen across different forums, and nothing was able to make it budge in the slightest. After some thinking, I grabbed my gear puller and was able to come up with a method that quickly and easily pulled the pump out with a satisfying pop. This took minutes to setup and requires really no effort. It may help to have 2 people, however I was able to do it alone on an engine stand, albeit being a little awkward to setup.

    To do this, I used 2 long sockets identical in length, a large wrench, and a gear puller.

    How to do it:

    1. Place the 2 sockets on the timing cover, on either side of the water pump.
    2. Place the wrench on top of the sockets, running across the center of the water pump. (it must clear the end of the pulley flange)
    3. Attach the gear puller to the water pump flange, and position the gear puller's bolt in the center of the wrench.
    4. Begin turning the bolt, and it should pull the pump out nice and quick. Be prepared for everything to fall after the tension is gone.

    This didn't damage my timing cover at all, and it didn't make me feel like I was going to break the pump into pieces unlike some of the other methods I had tried. I hope this write up helps someone who is experiencing the same problem, and I also hope such a method doesn't already exist, haha.

    #2
    Good tip, thanks. It beats tying a slide hammer to it with the radiator and grilles removed!

    Comment


      #3
      Don't M42 water pumps have two threaded holes you just put the bolts in and push the pump off with? Mine was really on there when I got it, tried to knock it off with a deadblow before I found those holes, but with the bolts it came right off.
      @turbovarg
      '91 318is, M20B25, T3/T04E 60 trim (18psi), megasquirt, coilovers, Z3 rack, cold AC
      [b u i l d]
      [Car of the month: April 2018]

      0c8b7c9527af628a346878feb14bf757

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        #4
        The threaded holes on the WP frequently break off when you use them, but they are still worth a shot.

        I've found that prying while whacking the WP yields the best results.

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          #5
          One idea I had, although I never ran into a WP that was this stuck, was to sawzall off the pulley flange and get a pipe wrench onto the aluminum body. If you can get the thing to turn/rotate a little, it'll break the corrosion holding it to the block, and then the little threaded flanges will work. Thankfully, all of the M42's I have had in the last decade have had relatively fresh WP's and they come right out with the threaded flanges.

          Comment


            #6
            Likewise, the dead blow hammer smacking it all the way around loosens it up a bit. Then the o- ring's the next sticky thing....

            t
            now, sometimes I just mess with people. It's more entertaining that way. george graves

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              #7
              The o-ring is easy, if you put a little bit of silicone dielectric grease on it first. I can pop the unit back in by hand like that.

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                #8
                M42 and 24v engines share a similar water pump design, I have always used the 6mm screws to pull them out, never had a tab break off after countless WP jobbers over the years.
                john@m20guru.com
                Links:
                Transaction feedback: Here, here and here. Thanks :D

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by bmwman91 View Post
                  The o-ring is easy, if you put a little bit of silicone dielectric grease on it first. I can pop the unit back in by hand like that.
                  Yes, on the reinstall. But removing a corroded water pump, the smacking breaks loose the aluminum- to- aluminum corrosion, but then
                  the o- ring binds on yon housing corrosion, and given its rubbery nature, resists the smacking method. The threaded holes helped not at all.
                  I resorted to a come- along on the E36 318, out the nose.
                  Pulled until the car started to slide, THEN started wiggling again, and spraying
                  with aluminum lube. Took about a half- hour, nonetheless...

                  The ti wasn't so bad.

                  tales from a wet climate,
                  t
                  now, sometimes I just mess with people. It's more entertaining that way. george graves

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