Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Careers Thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • mrsleeve
    replied
    ^
    As someone that actually builds the shit you put on paper, Common sense is far more rare that you seem to allude to.....

    Leave a comment:


  • LEANE30
    replied
    I'm sorta in the same line of work as Nando and Melon, energy (mostly oil & gas) cad designer. As far as designer jobs, as an industry it's pretty well paid. Moving laterally to any other industry (or even discipline) would equal substantially lower salary ranges. I sort of just fell into O&G Piping Design about 8 years ago after doing a series of other design-related work in different industries, but will likely make a healthy long term career out of it unless I get pulled toward more and more management responsibilities.

    Specifically I do Oil and Gas Piping Design, with a preference for CADWorx on Autocad, (other piping design programs are inferior.) Writing LISP programs and utilities to automate stuff comes up regularly. Ancillary work as well with piping and material specifications, engineering and municipal codes, and various critical systems database work. I enjoy giving Mechanical Engineers research to do, telling Structural Engineers what needs to be done, and showing Process Engineers what common sense looks like. If it wasn't for the piping there'd be no reason for structural designers to design anything. Looking at you Nando.

    Currently I am designing a compressor station. The company I work for is small on the scale for being an EPC(M) but we are known for being nimble, designing cryogenic gas processing plants as well as working with the mining industry, which really helps average out the boom and bust business cycles of O&G. Overall it's one of the most reputable, award winning firms in the greater Denver area, based in DTC and has been a great place to work, company culture is top notch, benefits are great, work is challenging and always changing, risk level is low, occasionally get out of the office, we do projects across the country and occasionally abroad. Get to dabble with ever evolving software and the technologies are always adapting. Having been able to do 3d laser scanning at facility scales, design multimillion dollar (project engineering budget) plants from the napkin sketch stage till standing in the middle of a final completed as-built plant is a humbling experience, sort of like summiting a 14er.

    Right now we actually have an opening for a senior level civil/structural designer... If either Nando or Melon would be interested in moving to Colorado...? Haha, PM me.
    Last edited by LEANE30; 09-18-2019, 08:55 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mrsleeve
    replied
    Originally posted by flyboyx View Post
    this dude.... i subscribe to his channel because there are some interesting vids on machine shop/ welding topics. for some reason, he decided to to make a self-help video. lol. in my opinion, this thing is awesome.

    i think everyone could benefit from taking a few minutes to watch it.



    https://youtu.be/E7RgtMGL7CA


    edit:

    aaaaaannnnd.....i see the youtube imbed function still doesn't work even with the new and improved r3v... :(
    I dont have many subscriptions on youtube (3 actually) , but AVE has been there for a long long time...... and its one of the few things on social media I look forward too

    Leave a comment:


  • roguetoaster
    replied
    Originally posted by flyboyx View Post
    aaaaaannnnd.....i see the youtube imbed function still doesn't work even with the new and improved r3v... :(
    Yeah, thought that was a big thing that was being fixed with the update, but noooooo.

    Leave a comment:


  • flyboyx
    replied
    this dude.... i subscribe to his channel because there are some interesting vids on machine shop/ welding topics. for some reason, he decided to to make a self-help video. lol. in my opinion, this thing is awesome.

    i think everyone could benefit from taking a few minutes to watch it.



    https://youtu.be/E7RgtMGL7CA


    edit:

    aaaaaannnnd.....i see the youtube imbed function still doesn't work even with the new and improved r3v... :(

    Leave a comment:


  • b5dover
    replied
    I feel like I should explain my story to help those on here who might need it.
    I grew up at the drag strip watching my father race a 9 second late second gen Camaro. I’ve always known that one way or another I was going to be involved in the automotive industry in one way or another. He always told me, it’s fine if you want to work on cars your entire career but just know that your body is going to show it by the time you’re 40 and my mother always told me she didn’t care what I did as long as I got a degree for it. Growing up through the 90’s and being one of the children of the internet generation I’ve always been fascinated by technology.
    I delivered pizza in high school in a small country town, honing my driving skills on the back roads of southwest Michigan in a lowly J body cavalier.
    After graduating high school, I started college for computer science but after one semester I realized that as much as I loved computers, programming just wasn’t for me. Those who do it live and breathe code, which is fine but I just couldn’t do it. I then got my associates degree in automotive technology from Kalamazoo Valley Community College (they have a wonderful program by the way and some of the best instructors I’ve ever had). While at KVCC I found the E30 that I still have to this day, an 88 325is. I’m in the middle of restoring it with a 5 lug E36 M3/318ti coil-over suspension, M54B30 with M50 intake and Megasquirt MS3X on E85 (prepping for a turbo, you’ll see why later…). I’ll make a thread for it once it’s worth showing off.
    Following that I completed the bachelors program in Automotive Engineering Technology from Ferris State University (yes it really is a B.S.) There are only a handful of universities that offer the ABET accredited degree. Think of it as a B.S.M.E but with more automotive specific classes instead of as much math. They actually have courses in engine airflow, dyno operation, and engine mechanical design.
    I interned at FEV in Auburn Hills learning the ins and outs of OBD certification and calibration. We basically took the diesel Euro 6 FIAT Ducato and made it comply with US OBD regulations to be sold as the RAM ProMaster.
    This all brings me to where I am today. I just passed my 5 year anniversary at ROUSH Performance in Livonia. I am privileged enough to oversee all engine calibrations for 15-20 Mustang, including 2.3L and 5.0L performance pacs and supercharged applications. Basically, we sell tuned versions of the stock engines as well as supercharging the V8. Not only do we have to make 700+ horsepower but they all have to pass emissions as well as durability requirements. It’s interesting to be in the middle of a blend of OE calibration as well as competing with all the other companies in the aftermarket in that space. I’ve even gone to California to tune the race engine for our D1 formula drift Mustang to 1000hp with the same supercharger hardware we sell every day. I never know what I’m going to get day to day, some days I spend all my time sitting at my computer releasing new calibrations to our flashing software or in meetings talking federal regulations, other times they ask me to go to the drag strip or road course to test things or fix problems (it helps when you have a competition drag racing license). Sometimes it’s spending 14 hours straight on the dyno making dozens of power pulls to make sure everything works the way it should.
    If anyone needs tuning advice or someone to look at their car for them in southeast Michigan let me know, I’ll do what I can to help.

    Leave a comment:


  • nando
    replied
    Originally posted by majdomo View Post
    May have put this higher up in the thread, but what is your line of work? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm a structural designer. Basically I work with the engineers to make sure their ideas actually work. :p It's sort of a niche within the energy industry.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	r0kxKx0.png
Views:	145
Size:	151.0 KB
ID:	9869734

    Actually I do way more beyond just 3D modeling and CAD. I do a lot of programming of tools and utilities that everyone uses (mostly in LISP and Perl), I set up and maintain all of our software, and I do training classes for the rest of the company.

    It's fun because I wear so many hats and can use other skills/hobbies beyond my job title. We still have a lot of people who are basically just drafters, and that's fine - but I'd have left long ago if that's all I ever did. Also, those people are the most easily replaced by unskilled laborers in certain 3rd world countries.

    I've also had opportunities to work on site, helping resolve field construction and fabrication issues (nothing cooler than seeing hundreds of workers building something you spent years designing). I was fortunate enough to work with an older (now retired) structural engineer, who not only did I understand "his head" if you know what I mean, he entrusted me to handle a lot of things an engineer would normally have done.

    Basically I just got lucky and got in at the right time and place. I never even finished my 4 year degree, but that honestly would have been a waste of time and money in my case. Marine, Rail, commercial, industrial - I've done it all. Marine projects are my favorite, but those come along rarely - like once every 25 years or so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sh3rpak!ng
    replied
    This is a very cool thread, nice idea! Already making mental notes of a couple of you guys I may PM in the near future

    My profession is supply chain management, specifically procurement.

    Started mowing lawns in the neighborhood at 11yrs old, did this every season until I went to college at 19. Still, to this day I wonder what could've happened if I skipped college or did college locally and grew this business. Took another summer job cleaning microscopes, and another working for a GC renovating houses during summer of later highschool years and college - wanted to learn more about building houses, be outside, and build some muscle (while getting paid) to impress the ladies - it worked During college I was a facilities manager and also interned with Airbus procurement dept.

    Got a B.S. degree in supply chain management

    Started real working life by moving to CA (because I could work on my car hobby all year round) and starting as a paid intern for a cement/construction company. Got dropped off at one of their cement plants in the Mojave desert with the mission to modernize their spare parts warehouse and stop the inventory bleeding of 40k write offs per month. Took a year but got it done. Then the company acquired another cement plant out in another desert and I did it again. Got tired of living out of hotels for months on end and was "promoted" to regional buyer overseeing procurement for a few batch plants in southern CA. This slowly sucked the life out of me as the central procurement organization deteriorated and I became a glorified AP trouble shooter. Then my boss/mentor left but hired me on to the company he moved to (a big infrastructure construction company) and we all got laid off 6 weeks later when that company decided that they didn't need centralized supply chain at all.

    Sigh.

    That sucked, but lead me to where I am now. Picked up a cool position as the purchasing manager for West Coast Customs which was a lot of fun but didn't pay well. Unfortunately a very poorly ran business with frequent cashflow problems. Stayed only for 8 months until I moved on to aerospace manufacturing as a procurement supervisor. Feels like my real career began here. This company makes a lot of money, but is very fast paced and high pressure. Publically owned (two layers deep) so it's all about the bottom line. Inside of the first six months the GM was fired, supply chain director quit, supply chain manager quit, procurement manager was hired and also quit, leaving me to keep it all together. I learned a lot fast because of it. Also learned that procurement as a strategic part of manufacturing is still mostly neglected - which is not necessarily a bad thing because there are loads of opportunities to cut cost and improve processes and not just here at this company but aerospace and manufacturing in general. Aerospace, as I understand, is also very strong right now and probably will be for a long time to come. The forecast is a doubling of air travelers over the next 20 years from 4b to 8b yearly. The aerospace manufacturing industry does not currently have the production capacity to support that. Next ten years will be interesting. I think I'll stay within aerospace for a while, or at least manufacturing. It keeps me on my toes. I'm now the manager of strategic sourcing with the whole procurement organization under me. My days zip by and are rarely boring. The facility houses something like 60 cnc lathes/mills inside of 4 buildings as well as their own forging shop. I work with loads of local machine shops and plating shops most of whom also have interests with cars, so they do me favors

    Leave a comment:


  • Staszek
    replied
    Just saw this thread, so my career has been pretty eclectic, and at the beginning I thought that I was a mess, not sure what I wanted to be when I grew up! Whoever is going through that and trying to do different things, its not a bad thing as long as you learn how to apply it later. I was a computer engineer by trade coming out of school, worked for Oracle, didn't like it, went over to finance for a huge fortune 100 after that. That wasn't my path either, went back to tech but in sales and an engineer for a startup. Super fun but not a ton of growth there, then I ended up where I am now, been here for 15 years.

    I am currently at an executive level in a fortune 100, and the only reason I got there is that I took all those experiences and connected how to run an overall business vs just an individual skillset. If anything I would say no matter what you do, just continue to learn from experiences and be able to change and grow. My dad told me once, if you think you know it all and don't want to learn or evolve you should probably retire because you are useless at that point.

    Leave a comment:


  • majdomo
    replied
    Originally posted by nando View Post
    I just hit my 12 year anniversary - wow, time flies. Needless to say, I like my job or I wouldn't have stayed so long. That, and there's really nothing comparable in my area that will pay anywhere nearly as much. Not having to clock in/out, flexible schedules, and pretty much being fully autonomous are huge benefits. And if I need to stay home with the kids, I can just log in and work remotely.
    May have put this higher up in the thread, but what is your line of work? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • nando
    replied
    I just hit my 12 year anniversary - wow, time flies.

    Needless to say, I like my job or I wouldn't have stayed so long. That, and there's really nothing comparable in my area that will pay anywhere nearly as much. Not having to clock in/out, flexible schedules, and pretty much being fully autonomous are huge benefits. And if I need to stay home with the kids, I can just log in and work remotely.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick_S
    replied
    First Job: detailing and prepping cars at my small towns local Chevy dealership, think I made $5.75/hr. Was there for a year
    2nd: Managed a small Skateshop a friend of mine owned, 2 years
    3rd: First bike shop, did assembly and minor service 1 year
    4rd: Second Bike shop. Did sales and service. Off and on for 3 years
    5th: RedBull, I set up all the local events and made sure all the bars had the appropriate RedBull swag. Was off and on for a few while also at the bike shop as it wasn't consistent.
    6th: Body Shop, detailed cars for customers after repair

    My 7th job is where I was started on my current path, I was 24 at the time and got an offer to run the warehouse for a BMX distribution company. I should also note I have ridden BMX since I was 9 years and at the time my entire life revolved around everything BMX so this was a literal DREAM job. I worked here for 5 years, built the warehouse and shipping department. Learned a ton about how business actually works and the ins and outs of the industry. I was sadly laid off once the BMX industry took a nose dive but have remained good friends with these dudes to this day.

    8th: Moved out to LA and worked for another bicycle company. Built another warehouse for them, set up relationships with FedEx which are both still in use today even though I was there for 1.2 year. Previous employer actually bought me a flight out to LA to interview for this job!

    9th. Moved to Colorado and briefly worked at a high end Mountain Bike shop. Being I had zero experience with high end mountain and the owner and I didn't always get along, my stay was brief.

    10th and current; I work for another bicycle company. A bit different from the previous few as we do almost all our sales on Amazon. Technically speaking I'm the Operations Manager but since we're small we all wear many hats. My primary roles are to manage our inventory levels at Amazon and make sure we function on a day to day basis. I handle all PO invoicing and receiving, inventory, sales forecasting, make sure we don't run out of supplies, work with our owner who does all the purchasing from our overseas factories. It gets boring but I have a TON of freedom here, make decent money and have unlimited time off so I can't complain. Plus it's allowing me to learn a different side to the industry and will help moving forward with so much of what we buy being from Amazon or other online retailers.

    Leave a comment:


  • z31maniac
    replied
    Originally posted by CMBusch View Post
    Yeah, I really don't think I'll be at the same job in 2 years time. Who knows... Anyone on here a mechanical engineer?
    I know, and have worked with plenty of them. I also know with a Journalism degree and similar number of years experience, they make about what I do. :)

    Software engineering is where it's at.

    Leave a comment:


  • ForcedFirebird
    replied
    1992-1996 Commission sales - mostly newspaper subscriptions (ran a door-to-door cold sales company)
    1996-2003 Concrete shell construction contractor, tinkered every night on vehicles
    2003-2007 general contractor by day, precision CNC machinist 4-5hrs at night (started my career in cars/engines making parts on the side)
    2007-2009 general contractor by day, bought a lift, rented a shop to fulfill income while real estate crashed
    2009-2011 GC business failing due to economy, opened a garage, then expanded said garage from 900sf to 2500sf
    2011-current garage is primary income, 80-90% of work is related to e30's, rest is filled up by 20+yr old BMW's. Have 3 stalls (lifts) plus most of the equip to machine in-house

    Plan on staying "stagnant" until 2025 when the last of the kids graduate, then moving to N.FL, or S.GA and turning the high overhead of city life into smaller rural mortgage with a home and pole barn or hanger in the back yard and continuing the path of manufacturing and building cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • CMBusch
    replied
    Yeah, I really don't think I'll be at the same job in 2 years time. Who knows... Anyone on here a mechanical engineer?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X